photorefractive effect

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photorefractive effect

[‚fōd·ō·ri′frak·tiv i′fekt]
(optics)
An effect displayed by many electrooptic materials in which a change in the index of refraction is induced by the presence of light, and this change is retained for a time after the light exposure ceases.
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All patients with no history of another corneal surgery who underwent photorefractive surgery with excimer laser in the Virgilio Galvis Ophthalmological Center, and who achieved postoperative distance corrected visual acuity better than 20/40 and to whom corneal tomography with the Sirius[R] tomographer was performed at least ten weeks after the procedure, were included in the study.
Influence of the volume speckle on fiber specklegram sensors based on four-wave mixing in photorefractive materials.
Bazan, "Topical combination of NGF and DHA increases rabbit corneal nerve regeneration after photorefractive keratectomy," Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol.
Esta tecnica empezo a utilizarse en 1990 como tratamiento para las ectasias corneales, principalmente el queratocono, asi como iatrogenicas post-LASIK (Laser assisted in Situ Keratomileusis) y post-PRK (Photorefractive keratectomy).
Garcia, "Ten years after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for moderate to high myopia (controlmatched study)," British Journal of Ophthalmology, vol.
Kashyap, "Use of e-beam written, reactive ion etched, phase masks for the generation of novel photorefractive fibre gratings," Microelectronic Engineering, vol.
One year results of photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis for myopia using a 213nm wavelength solid-state laser.
Comparison of postoperative pain following laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy and transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy: a prospective, random paired bilateral eye study.
Among the topics are liquid gradient refractive index lenses, photorefractive polymers for three-dimensional display applications, optimal gene detection using conjugated polymers, polymer ion sensors based on intramolecular charge-transfer interactions, detecting explosives and metal ions using fluorescent polymers and their nanostructures, holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystals: from materials and morphologies to applications, and polymer nanostructures through packing spheres.
For dopant mediated mechanisms such as thermal, order parameter and photorefractive effects (where the presence of a dc bias field is another factor to contend), we show only representative values from the literature where the nonlinear optical responses were observed in samples of reasonable (< 50%) absorption loss.
In a photorefractive crystal, two-wave mixing can be explained as the nonlinear interaction of intensity and phase between two incident beams through the photorefractive effect [1-3].