photosensitive glass

photosensitive glass

[¦fōd·ō′sen·səd·iv ′glas]
(graphic arts)
Glass containing submicroscopic metallic particles; when ultraviolet light passes through a negative on the glass, it precipitates the particles, with shadowed areas of the negative permitting deeper penetration into the glass than highlight areas, giving the picture three dimensions and color; photograph is developed by heating the glass to 1000°F (538°C).
References in periodicals archive ?
Stookey's serendipitous discovery of controlled crystallization of glass, originating in a furnace malfunction of a photosensitive glass containing silver nuclei, eventually led to a myriad of non-porous ceramic products used for missile nosecones, cookware, radiant stovetops, and insulating components on the Space Shuttle.
Donald Stookey, a retired Corning research fellow, was presented with the National Medal of Technology by President Ronald Reagan for his invention of glass-ceramics, photosensitive glass and photochromic glass.
Corning's entire Photonic Materials product portfolio, including various specialty fibers, polarizing glass, GRIN lenses, lensed fiber, photosensitive glass and other specialty materials, will be on exhibit during the Optical Fiber Communication (OFC) conference February 24-26 in Los Angeles, California.
Corning SMILE lens array is fabricated with a unique photolithography process and one of Corning's proprietary photosensitive glass materials.