photosensitive

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photosensitive

sensitive to electromagnetic radiation, esp light

photosensitive

[¦fōd·ō′sen·səd·iv]
(electronics)

photosensitive

A material that changes when exposed to light. See photoelectric.
References in periodicals archive ?
DDS-induced photosensitivity with reference to six case reports.
In this study the presence of photosensitivity and oral ulcers were more frequent in patients with RP.
This is crucial to understanding photosensitivity and lupus because TNF-alpha has been shown to stimulate apoptosis, the process of cellular death.
With this measurement technique, the effect of glass composition, fabrication processes, and irradiation conditions on photosensitivity can be studied quantitatively.
A high peak power pulsed infrared (femto-second) laser is focused on the substrate and induces a 2-photon polarization phenomenon of the photosensitive polymers (negative photosensitivity polarity).
18,19,20 Photosensitivity was reported in 49% which was comparable in prevalence with Middle East,20 but lower than in Pakistan.
Upon its approval, the FDA required five postmarketing studies for canagliflozin: a cardiovascular outcomes trial; an enhanced pharmacovigilance program to monitor for malignancies, serious cases of pancreatitis, severe hypersensitivity reactions, photosensitivity reactions, liver abnormalities, and adverse pregnancy outcomes; a bone safety study; and two pediatric studies under the Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA), including a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study and a safety and efficacy study.
Discontinuations were mainly due to rash and classic adverse skin reactions, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, drug reaction with eosinophilia, and systemic symptoms, whereas reactions involving only photosensitivity or cutaneous carcinomas rarely resulted in treatment adjustment, the researchers noted.
Two of Lee-Anne and Phil's children, Jake, 11, and six-year-old Charlee, suffer from idiopathic epilepsy with photosensitivity.
A number of medications--including some antibiotics, antidepressants, antimicrobials, antipsychotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and several other drug classes--can cause "chemical photosensitivity," a reaction to ultraviolet (UV) light that makes the skin extra-sensitive to the sun.