phrase


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phrase

Grammatical phrases are groups of two or more words that work together to perform a single grammatical function in a sentence. Unlike clauses, phrases do not contain both a subject and a predicate (although they sometimes function as one or the other).
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phrase

1. Music a small group of notes forming a coherent unit of melody
2. (in choreography) a short sequence of dance movements

Phrase

 

the basic unit of speech. Corresponding to the sentence as a basic unit of language, the phrase is a syntactic and phonetic entity with syntactic structure, semantic completeness, and intonational markers. Phrase boundaries are indicated by pauses and by specific intonational features that indicate the end of the phrase. For example, in Russian there is a lowering of tone on the final syllable of a phrase. Phrases are divided into syntagms, which in turn consist of phonetic words and syllables. The laws of the phrase’s sandhi, that is, of the phonetic boundaries of the phrase’s components, function within the phrase. An example is liaison in French—a type of consonant alternation.

The concept of the phrase is sometimes synonymous with that of the sentence. The term “phrase” is occasionally used to designate any phonetic and syntactic entity between two pauses.

References in classic literature ?
It suited her exactly, and soon she began to imitate the manners and conversation of those about her, to put on little airs and graces, use French phrases, crimp her hair, take in her dresses, and talk about the fashions as well as she could.
If they are anxious to see you happily married, here is a man whose amiable character gives every assurance of it;if they wish to have you settled in the same country and circle which they have chosen to place you in, here it will be accomplished; and if their only object is that you should, in the common phrase, be well married, here is the comfortable fortune, the respectable establishment, the rise in the world which must satisfy them.
I abhor every common-place phrase by which wit is intended; and 'setting one's cap at a man,' or 'making a conquest,' are the most odious of all.
This phrase, uttered in my hearing yesterday, would have only conveyed the notion that she was about to be removed to Northumberland, to her own home.
He had his private manner of interpreting the phrase, and it seemed necessary the brother should sin different sins on every occasion.
In Miss Garth's favorite phrase, "Magdalen was born with all the senses -- except a sense of order.
On our little walk along the quays, he made himself the most interesting companion, telling me about the different ships that we passed by, their rig, tonnage, and nationality, explaining the work that was going forward--how one was discharging, another taking in cargo, and a third making ready for sea--and every now and then telling me some little anecdote of ships or seamen or repeating a nautical phrase till I had learned it perfectly.
The phrase drifted loose in my mind for a moment, and then I saw it in red lettering on a little buff-coloured pamphlet, to read which made one shiver and creep.
Language in general includes the following parts:- Letter, Syllable, Connecting word, Noun, Verb, Inflexion or Case, Sentence or Phrase.
Observe that the word "religione" was suffered to stand in the text of the Testina, being used to signify indifferently every shade of belief, as witness "the religion," a phrase inevitably employed to designate the Huguenot heresy.
He makes incisions round them, or in technical phrase, belts them with his teeth, and when they fall, they naturally take the direction in which their trunks or branches preponderate.
It was not long, however, before I discovered, to use a homely phrase, that something had happened; and I was not altogether without curiosity to know what that something was.