frenulum

(redirected from Phren)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

frenulum

[′fren·yə·ləm]
(anatomy)
A small fold of integument or mucous membrane.
A small ridge on the upper part of the anterior medullary velum.
(invertebrate zoology)
A spine on most moths that projects from the hindwings and is held to the forewings by a clasp, thus coupling the wings together.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Da mesma forma, tambem a terminologia homerica para "vida" vai para alem de psyche, utilizando outros termos importantes como thymos, phrenes boule e nous, que formam uma "multiplicidade de almas vitais ou almas funcionais, que correspondem as diferentes formas de manifestacao da vida", tal qual Bohme (apud Reale, 2002, p.
The ancient Greek word for it, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] = "phren," also referred to it as the location of the "soul" (= "mind"), which it designated as well (see also schizophrenia).
Yn lle mod i yn treulio hanner awr cyn pacio bob anrheg yn chwilota ym mhob stafell am y selotp (a''r siswrn, a beiro, a rwber, a phren mesur) - fyddai modd i mi gael cyflenwad o''r pethau hyn yn fy nesg, a NEB YN EI DWYN Byddai hynny yn lleihau straen yr weyl yn ddirfawr.
Outro termo relacionado com a vida psiquica seria phren (ou phrenes, no plural).
La palabra se deriva de dos raices griegas: schizo, que significa rasgar o separar, y phren, que significa el intelecto o la mente, y fue usada para referirse a una disfuncion emocional.
You will solve the riddle if you put together three Greek words: sos, meaning harmony and health; phren, meaning spirit and diaphragm, and logos, meaning dialogue and science.
By using three different variants of the root phren, Aeschylus emphasizes that Zeus imposes the kind of justice that teaches men "rational, logical, symbolic thought" (Goldhill 27), but does so in a choral ode that yields itself to no clear interpretation.
1912: SCHIZOPHRENIA - Derived from the Greeks words Skhizein (to split) and phren (mind), it was first coined by German psychologist Eugen Bleuler.
`My tongue did swear, my heart (or `mind', phren) remains unsworn,' cries out Hipploytos to Phaidra, thereby threatening to break his oath of silence and reveal to Theseus her shameful proposition (Eur.