phrenic nerve

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phrenic nerve

[′fren·ik ¦nərv]
(neuroscience)
A nerve, arising from the third, fourth, and fifth cervical (cervical plexus) segments of the spinal cord; innervates the diaphragm.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The spinal accessory and the phrenic nerves were sacrificed during the operation due to the tumor's invaginating these nerves.
Mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations (PND) (Bulbring, 1946) were incubated for 60 min with 50 [micro]g/mL of the methanolic extract in Tyrode solution (composition in mM: NaCl 137, KCl 2.7, Ca[Cl.sub.2] 1.8, Mg[Cl.sub.2] 0.49, Na[H.sub.2]P[O.sub.4] 0.42, NaHC[O.sub.3] 11.
An anatomical study by Banneheka identified the phrenic nerve and accessory phrenic nerve.
Insidious phrenic nerve involvement in postpolio syndrome.
First, there remains a potential concern for phrenic nerve paralysis after an infraclavicular nerve block.
Spinal cord compression due to cervical spine anomalies, although rare, should therefore be kept in the differential diagnosis of a newborn suspected of having neonatal encephalopathy, as it can present with respiratory failure due to phrenic nerve palsy with neurological sequelae.
The phrenic nerve originates from cervical nerve roots C3-5 with the dominant supply coming from C4.
Phrenic nerve injury is one of the frequent causes, especially at delivery, followed by neoplastic infiltration, compressions, or surgical interventions [4, 17, 18].
Overall, it was found that cryoballoon ablation had a 10.3 times greater odds of postoperative phrenic nerve injury at 12-month follow-up in comparison to radiofrequency ablation alone (OR = 10.3, CI = 3.09 to 34.6, [I.sup.2] = 0%, p = 0.0001) [5,6,14-16,18].
Cervical spinal cord hemisections give rise to increased 5-[HT.sub.2A] receptor protein in phrenic MNs and their subsequent increased excitability [27].
Although possible, it would appear that risk of diaphragm paralysis secondary to injury of the phrenic nerve is indeed rare.
Abstracted data included the following: 1) type of study, study size, study design, use of CF catheter or CB, and follow-up; 2) age, gender, detailed information pertaining to AF, PAF and/or Per AF patient subgroups, if available; 3) AF recurrence within 12 months; 4) complications including embolic event, tamponade, esophageal injury and transient phrenic nerve palsy, and 5) parameters related to safety, such as procedure duration and fluoroscopy duration.