Phyletic Evolution

phyletic evolution

[fī′led·ik ‚ev·ə′lü·shən]
(evolution)
The gradual evolution of population without separation into isolated parts.

Phyletic Evolution

 

a type of evolution characterized by the gradual change, without divergence, of an entire group of organisms. The term “phyletic evolution” was proposed by the American paleontologist G. Simpson, who distinguished it from speciation, the divergent development of two or more daughter species from a single parent species. However, it is now recognized that speciation occurs even with phyletic evolution, but the new species are formed successively, over a significant period of time. Phyletic evolution is usually characterized by moderate or low evolution rates and is detected when one studies the evolution of supraspeciestaxons.

References in periodicals archive ?
In future studies, the C values of species from the order Rhynchonellida, which have not yet been determined, must be examined, and relationships between C values and phyletic evolution should be examined because the phyletic relationship of brachiopods has not yet been clarified.
An excellent example of phyletic evolution is proposed by White, et al.
Moreover, Simpson added that speciation has limited quantitative importance among the three major modes of evolution (speciation, phyletic evolution, and quantum evolution), for 90% of paleontological data record another process: "nine-tenths of the pertinent data of paleontology fall into patterns in the phyletic mode" (1944, p.