physical anthropology


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Related to physical anthropology: Forensic anthropology

physical anthropology

[′fiz·ə·kəl ‚an·thrə′päl·ə·jē]
(anthropology)
The science that deals with the biological aspects of humankind and their relation to historical or cultural aspects. Also known as biological anthropology.

physical anthropology

See ANTHROPOLOGY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the article by Hadley and Crooks (2012) was not reviewed for this article, as it was published in the Yearbook of Physical Anthropology, their theoretical review of the types of biosocial risks posed by modern famines acts as a rigorous template for bioarchaeologists to follow in seeking applications for past events.
However, it was physical anthropology that developed a particularly powerful bond with the Great War.
of the Aegean, Greece) explores the emergence and trajectory of physical anthropology in Greece from its first integration in the University of Athens by the establishment of the Anthropological Laboratory and Museum in 1886, the later establishment of a chair for physical anthropology there in 1925, to the dissolution during the 1970s of the Greek Anthropological Society, which was founded in 1924.
16) What follows is a prodigiously researched 500-page compendium filled with fascinating and useful information about Russian physical anthropology but which, ultimately, fails to support the author's claims.
Made in the name of physical anthropology at a time when race was understood as a biological concept, these sculptures occupied a grey area between anthropology and art.
Focusing on a European-trained American naturalist, Samuel George Morton, she depicts the racist underpinnings of early physical anthropology and Morton's role in the development of American craniology.
Carabelli's trait and tooth size of human maxillary first molar; American journal of physical Anthropology 2007, ISSN 0002-9483.
As part of the project, lectures in physical anthropology have been held at the Ministry of Heritage and Culture aimed at giving the Archaeological department a new tool to interpret the excavated material.
For many years, anthropologists have asked who the first Americans were and how they were able to settle in the last major habitat open to humans," notes Jeff Long, an editor for the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.
Gopher and Barkai recently published their findings in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, and in a recent interview, Gopher said that he was positive that further exploration of the cave would yield the skull that the teeth belong to, as well as other artifacts from the same era, confirming that modern humans were already in existence at the time, or even earlier.
Brief communication: Stature estimation in extinct Aonikenk and the myth of Patagonian gigantism" American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 105:545-551.

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