Piassava

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Related to piassaba: Piaçaba, Pissaba

Piassava

 

a stiff fiber from the leaf sheaths of several species of tropical palm, including the American Leopoldinia piassaba, the African Raphia vinifera, and the Asian Borassus flabellifer. The fibers, which are formed by the vascular bundles, are 0.5-3.5 mm thick and 0.5-1.8 m long. They range in color from straw to almost black. The fibers result from the natural maceration of the sheaths of fallen leaves. Piassava is used for making brushes, mats, and ropes.

References in periodicals archive ?
Leopoldinia piassaba Wallace (Arecaceae): a few biological and economic data from the Rio Negro region (Brazil).
Leopoldinia piassaba Wallace (Arecaceae): a few ecological and economic data from the rio Negro region (Brazil).
Aphandra natalia (Arecaceae) a little known source of piassaba fibers from the western Amazon.
Leopoldinia piassaba (piassava in Brazil, chiquichiqui in Colombia and Venezuela, fibra in Colombia) is distributed in the upper Rio Negro region of Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela (Figure 1), especially on poor and sandy soils associated with black water rivers where it forms extensive single-species patches covering several hectares.
These efforts include planting, long-fallow slash-and-burn practices or benign neglect, meaning no special care is carried out within the natural piassaba stands besides one annual harvest (Voeks, 1988, 2002; Henderson et al.
Leopoldinia piassaba and Attalea funifera are widely sold in Brazil.
Leopoldinia piassaba Wallace (Areacaceae): A few biological and economic data from the Rio Negro region (Brazil).
Other examples of palms managed by mestizos are Astrocaryum standleyanum which is used for production of leaf fibers in Pacific Ecuador and Aphandra natalia which, in the Amazon of Ecuador, is managed for production of piassaba fibers from the leaf sheaths (Borgtoft Pedersen, 1992, 1994; Fadiman, 2003).
gasipaes and, to a lesser extent, Mauritia flexuosa from Peru (Rios, 2001; SUNAT, 2006); piassava fibers of Attalea funifera from Brazil (Voeks, 1988), and those of Leopoldinia piassaba from Colombia and Brazil (Centro de Comercio Internacional, 1969; Crizon, 2001; Linares et al.
chikichiki: Leopoldinia piassaba (piapoco) [Pharris de Klumpp, 1995]
hanon: Leopoldinia piassaba (puinave) [Hablante anonimo, Bogota, com.
1995), and another understory palm, Leopoldinia piassaba, has high densities of seedlings, juveniles, and adults on gley and podzol soils in a floodplain forest, whereas only a few seedlings and small juveniles occur on a nearby hill (Lescure et al.