picayune


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Picayune

(pĭkəyo͞on`), city (1990 pop. 10,633), Pearl River co., S Miss., near the Pearl River and the La. line; inc. 1904. It is the trade, processing, and shipping center for an agricultural area with cotton, corn, pecans, cattle, and dairying. Manufactures include elevators, chemicals, polyurethane, metal containers, and computer equipment. NASA's Stennis Space Center and the Crosby Arboretum are nearby.

picayune

US and Canadian informal
1. the half real, an old Spanish-American coin
2. US any coin of little value, esp a five-cent piece
References in periodicals archive ?
Picayune Wood Treating used creosote to coat and treat wood and lumber products such as telephone poles.
The Times-Picayune pone de manifiesto la universalidad de un discurso en el que todos tienen voz: "En una ciudad con una docena de acentos distintos, The Picayune es la voz de todos ellos.
Secretary Emma Picayune announced the apprehension and prosecution of 546,000 healthcare criminals.
Keesler Federal Credit Union, Biloxi, Miss., held a grand opening for its new Picayune office.
"Porcupine, Picayune & Post: How Newspapers Get Their Names" is a fascinating and analytical history of how many of America's newspapers came to carry distinctive, even whimsical, names like 'Jimplecute', 'Acantha', 'Zephry', 'Gondolier', 'Iconoclast' or 'Bazzo'.
Porcupine, Picayune, & Post; how newspapers get their names.
State Farm Companies Foundation agreed and created a number of grams that were awarded to five districts: Moss Point and Picayune in Mississippi; Capdau Charter School and Sophie B.
Others are testing the waters as well, says Robbins, who co-edits the SLED Picayune, an educator's "in-world" newspaper.
(3) He migrated to the village of Plaquemine, Louisiana, in 1838 or 1839, married into a prominent Creole family (the Heberts of Iberville Parish); became a small-time slave owner; founded and edited a bilingual (English-French) weekly newspaper, the Plaquemine Planters' Gazette, which, between late December 1840 and 1845, he owned and edited and which provided an early venue for his wit and humor; became active in the local militia (which he often referred to as the "Village Army"); served as coroner, justice of the peace, deputy sheriff, and secretary of the local Democratic Party; owned a local store which sold groceries, books and music, and other provisions; and from 1840 to 1848 contributed humorous dialect letters to the New Orleans Picayune under the pseudonym, Pardon Jones.
Allen Powell H is a reporter at the New Orleans Times Picayune.