piece

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Related to pieces: Sacha

piece

1. a length by which a commodity is sold, esp cloth, wallpaper, etc.
2. a literary, musical, or artistic composition
3. a coin having a value as specified
4. a small object, often individually shaped and designed, used in playing certain games, esp board games
5. any chessman other than a pawn
6. Austral and NZ fragments of fleece wool

piece

[pēs]
(ordnance)
An artillery weapon, a machine gun, a rifle, or any firearm.
References in classic literature ?
So I took the gun and went up a piece into the woods, and was hunting around for some birds when I see a wild pig; hogs soon went wild in them bottoms after they had got away from the prairie farms.
It fell into the street and was instantly broken into a thousand pieces.
Then the youth told him of the piece of good luck that had befallen him, and asked him for the hand of his beautiful daughter.
It is worth another franc, mademoiselle," she said, "to cut a handkerchief from the CENTRE of the piece.
We shall not miss them, so stake twenty pieces at a time.
Monsieur," D'Artagnan hastened to say, "the host is bringing me up a pretty piece of roasted poultry and a superb tourteau.
And when the full moon had risen, Hansel took his little sister by the hand, and followed the pebbles which shone like newly-coined silver pieces, and showed them the way.
The children had discovered the glittering hoard, and when in a mischievous mood used to fling showers of moidores, diamonds, pearls and pieces of eight to the gulls, who pounced upon them for food, and then flew away, raging at the scurvy trick that had been played upon them.
Why, they're made in a good many small pieces," explained the kangaroo; "and whenever any stranger comes near them they have a habit of falling apart and scattering themselves around.
One player has twenty black pieces, the other, twenty orange pieces.
Monsieur Thuran spread his coat upon the bottom of the boat, and then from a handful of money he selected six franc pieces.
A ROBBER who had plundered a Merchant of one thousand pieces of gold was taken before the Cadi, who asked him if he had anything to say why he should not be decapitated.