piezoelectric


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piezoelectric

[pē¦ā·zō·ə′lek·trik]
(solid-state physics)
Having the ability to generate a voltage when mechanical force is applied, or to produce a mechanical force when a voltage is applied, as in a piezoelectric crystal.

piezoelectric

The property of certain crystals that causes them to produce voltage when a mechanical pressure is applied to them such as sound vibrations. This technique is used to build crystal microphones, phonograph cartridges and strain gauges, all of which turn mechanical movement into voltage.

The piezoelectric effect also works in reverse, causing an oscillation when the material is subjected to electrical pressure (voltage). For example, earphones and inkjet nozzles are made with piezoelectric materials. See inkjet printer.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Finite Element Simulation of Dynamic Responses of Piezoelectric Actuators." Journal of Sound and Vibration 191 (4): 519-538.
Moreover, it is judged that this sensor can be applied to large-sized structure since it is possible to install large numbers of generators at relatively low cost by using unimorph piezoelectric sensor which is easy to handle.
However, less is known about interrelationship between the composite processing technique and the morphology and properties of the electrically conductive particles, which dictate the effective piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composite material [6, 32].
The increase in frictional energy dissipation can be massively offset by the decrease in free volume of matrix at 60 wt.% content of PMN, and the impact of piezoelectric effect on damping properties can be significantly indicated.
In order to create a piezoelectric material, Song Ko has to introduce an internal polarization using a strong electrical field.
Figures 1 and 2 show the primary hysteresis system containing NES and a piezoelectric element.
The VM3000 is the first digital microphone in Vesper's portfolio and greatly expands the number of applications that can be serviced with robust piezoelectric MEMS microphones.
Porous piezoelectric polymers are also extremely flexible and make them ideal candidates for compliant sensors or energy harvesters.
The solutions described in this contribution are based on vibration energy harvesting using a piezoelectric converter.
Piezoelectric motors are used in microscopy, robotics, photographic equipment, nanometrology, nanolithography, nanoprint, microdosing, etc.