piezoelectric effect


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Related to piezoelectric effect: Piezoelectric transducer

piezoelectric effect

(pīē'zōĭlĕk`trĭk), voltage produced between surfaces of a solid dielectric (nonconducting substance) when a mechanical stress is applied to it. A small current may be produced as well. The effect, discovered by Pierre Curie in 1883, is exhibited by certain crystals, e.g., quartz and Rochelle salt, and ceramic materials. When a voltage is applied across certain surfaces of a solid that exhibits the piezoelectric effect, the solid undergoes a mechanical distortion. Piezoelectric materials are used in transducerstransducer,
device that accepts an input of energy in one form and produces an output of energy in some other form, with a known, fixed relationship between the input and output. One widely used class of transducers consists of devices that produce an electric output signal, e.g.
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, e.g., phonograph cartridges, microphones, and strain gauges, which produce an electrical output from a mechanical input, and in earphones and ultrasonic radiators, which produce a mechanical output from an electrical input. Piezoelectric solids typically resonate within narrowly defined frequency ranges; when suitably mounted they can be used in electric circuits as components of highly selective filters or as frequency-control devices for very stable oscillatorsoscillator, electronic
, electronic circuit that produces an output signal of a specific frequency. An oscillator generally consists of an amplifier having part of its output returned to the input by means of a feedback loop; the necessary and sufficient condition for
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.

piezoelectric effect

[pē¦ā·zō·ə′lek·trik i′fekt]
(solid-state physics)
The generation of electric polarization in certain dielectric crystals as a result of the application of mechanical stress.
The reverse effect, in which application of a voltage between certain faces of the crystal produces a mechanical distortion of the material.

piezoelectric effect

, piezoelectricity
Physics
a. the production of electricity or electric polarity by applying a mechanical stress to certain crystals
b. the converse effect in which stress is produced in a crystal as a result of an applied potential difference
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in bulk MoS2, successive layers are oriented in opposite directions, and generate positive and negative voltages that cancel each other out and give zero net piezoelectric effect.
Teijin Limited (Tokyo, Japan) and Kansai University (Osaka, Japan) have announced that Teijin's New Films Development Section and Kansai professor Yoshiro Tajitsu have developed a flexible, transparent piezoelectric material that demonstrates unprecedented piezoelectric effects.
Clinical experience now indicates that these deep areas can be reached and effectively stimulated by utilising the piezoelectric effect of specifically sized quartz crystal tools.
Kovaleski's team published "Investigation of the Piezoelectric Effect as a Means to Generate X-Rays" in the journal IEEE Transaction on Plasma Science.
33] coefficient is the principal element reflecting the piezoelectric behavior and its determination gives a quantitative evaluation of the piezoelectric effect.
The piezoelectric effect occurs when a strain on a material, caused by pushing on it for example, reversibly changes the crystal structure in one direction enough to make an electric field.
22, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The most promising effect of thin film PZT for future aplications would certainly be its piezoelectric effect In September 2013, EPSON has announced its 2nd generation inkjet technology, PrecisionCore 2nd version (to be released in 2014), introducing for the first time MEMS inkjet heads manufactured with thin film PZT technology for office desktop printers.
He explained that when the black branes are bent and folded into a blackfold, a so-called piezoelectric effect (electricity that occurs due to pressure) is created.
Although the piezoelectric effect is generally based on electric dipoles, diverse cellular polymer films exhibit a ferroelectric behavior when the cavities of the polymer are charged by means of a high electrical field.
The triboelectric generator could supplement power produced by nanogenerators that use the piezoelectric effect to create current from the flexing of zinc oxide nanowires.
Mechanical engineers Erturk (Georgia Institute of Technology) and Inman (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University) describe in detail electromechanical modeling of using the piezoelectric effect to convert ambient vibration into useful electrical energy.