piezoelectric element

piezoelectric element

[pē¦ā·zō·ə′lek·trik ′el·ə·mənt]
(electronics)
A piezoelectric crystal used in an electric circuit, for example, as a transducer to convert mechanical or acoustical signals to electric signals, or to control the frequency of a crystal oscillator.
References in periodicals archive ?
A piezoelectric membrane consists of a membrane made of a flexible material onto which a piezoelectric element is bonded.
In addition, the energy-saving characteristics of the piezoelectric element itself, which requires very little power during standby, are garnering increased attention C particularly in the sensor market where explosive growth is expected.
Instrument electrode "Tweezer", made of rustfree sheet plate with screws to fix the piezoelectric element, is attached to a ceramic back-plate.
Application of a fourth piezoelectric element under the big toe, where many mechanoreceptors are located, and an individually controllable amplitude of each piezoelectric element may contribute to improvement of the effects of the vibrating insoles [19].
The STM employs a very fine tip--only one or a few atoms across--connected to a piezoelectric element, a tiny cylinder that lengthens or shortens minutely as the voltage on it changes.
The Elliptec motor uses a piezoelectric element to generate high-speed ultrasonic vibrations (up to 100,000 times per second) that in turn can spin a wheel or move a rod.
The first mode shape of vibration is responsible for energy generation, whereas second (II) and third (III) mode shapes (9389 Hz and 14855 Hz) are deforming piezoelectric element in a symmetrical fashion, thus canceling out the generated charge.
Examples include light captured by photovoltaic cells, vibration captured by a piezoelectric element, heat captured by a thermoelectric generator, and RF (e.
b) The piezoelectric element in the form of a segmented ring in which segments are supplied alternately.
By upgrading the mounting method of the piezoelectric element from wire bonding to flip-chip construction, the SAW Duplexer's footprint was reduced 52 percent when compared to its predecessors.
The sensors consist of a unique system of matched piezoelectric elements arranged in a 'reciprocal' configuration providing a functional test capability.
With their sound capsule technology, these sounders deliver more low-frequency punch than piezoelectric elements for superior sound penetration through walls, doors, and obstructions.