piezopolymer

piezopolymer

[pē¦ā·zō′päl·ə·mər]
(organic chemistry)
A polymeric film that has the ability to reversibly convert heat and pressure to electricity. Also known as piezoelectric polymer.
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According to the new market research report"Piezoelectric Devices Market by Material (Piezoceramic, Piezopolymer, Piezocomposite), Product (Actuators, Transducers, Motors, Sensors, Generators), Application (Industrial, Automotive, Medical, Consumer) & Geography - Global Trend & Forecast to 2020" , published by MarketsandMarkets, on Piezoelectric Devices, the market is expected to reach USD 27.
Specific topics include the characterization of ferroelectric polymers; their use in application applications such as energy storing and harvesting and piezopolymer biosensors; conducting polymers and carbon nanotubes; electrochemical transistors as chemical sensors; and the combination of charge electrets and organic semiconductors for creating memory devices, inverters, and logic circuits.
Scientists around the world use the piezopolymer for a huge and growing list of applications, ranging from robotic tactile sensors to sleepapnea monitors to help prevent sudden infant death syndrome.
Among the advanced technologies comprised in MEAS sensors are: piezoresistive applications, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), and piezopolymers.
Measurement Specialties uses multiple advanced technologies, including piezoresistive, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), piezopolymers, and strain gages to allow their sensors to operate precisely and cost effectively.
In this research, Frost & Sullivan's expert analysts thoroughly examine the following technologies: Piezoelectric materials such as piezoceramics, piezocomposites, piezopolymers and piezoelectric crystals, as well as piezoelectric devices.
The Company uses multiple advanced technologies, including piezoresistive, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), piezopolymers, and strain gages to allow their sensors to operate precisely and cost effectively.