layer

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layer

1. one of four or more levels of vegetation defined in ecological studies: the ground or moss layer, the field or herb layer, the shrub layer, and one or more tree layers
2. a laying hen
3. Horticulture
a. a shoot or branch rooted during layering
b. a plant produced as a result of layering

layer

[′lā·ər]
(computer science)
One of the divisions within which components or functions are isolated in a computer system with layered architecture or a communications system with layered protocols.
(geology)
A tabular body of rock, ice, sediment, or soil lying parallel to the supporting surface and distinctly limited above and below.
(geophysics)
One of several strata of ionized air, some of which exist only during the daytime, occurring at altitudes between 30 and 250 miles (50 and 400 kilometers); the layers reflect radio waves at certain frequencies and partially absorb others.
(metallurgy)
The stratum of weld metal consisting of one or more passes and lying parallel to the welding surface.

course

course, 1
1. A layer of masonry units running horizontally in a wall or, much less commonly, curved over an arch; it is bonded with mortar.
2. A continuous row or layer of material, as shingles, tiles, etc.

layer

layer

(1) One of several "drawing boards" or "canvasses" for creating elements in a picture. See layers and flatten layers.

(2) One of several levels in a communications protocol. See OSI model.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Until now, the analysis had remained qualitative, because all the pigment layers were considered simultaneously New technical advances and software have now allowed us to resolve cross-sections of the layers and to quantitatively analyze the composition and thickness of the individual pigment layers."
Although O'Donoghue addressed his Passion works avowedly disinterested in their religious content, the subject matter of the Passion--seen as journey, metamorphosis, sacrifice--well suited this painter's language: the gradual building up in rich pigment layers toward delineation of form, and the tension in reconciling the abstract values of his very sensual large colour fields (he studied Rothko and Newman) with his interest in the conceptual potential inherent in the human image.
Detail was created laboriously with fine brushes of hair from live squirrels, luster achieved from burnishing the surface, which also bonded pigment layers to the support (2).