pigweed


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Related to pigweed: purslane

pigweed,

name for several weedy plants, particularly the common pigweed or lamb's-quarters of the family Chenopodiaceae (goosefootgoosefoot,
common name for the genus Chenopodium, as well as for the goosefoot family, Chenopodiaceae, a family of widely distributed shrubs and herbs that includes the beet, spinach, and mangel-wurzel.
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 family), the rough pigweed, or green amaranthamaranth
[Gr.,=unfading], common name for the Amaranthaceae (also commonly known as the pigweed family), a family of herbs, trees, and vines of warm regions, especially in the Americas and Africa.
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, of the related family Amaranthaceae (amaranthamaranth
[Gr.,=unfading], common name for the Amaranthaceae (also commonly known as the pigweed family), a family of herbs, trees, and vines of warm regions, especially in the Americas and Africa.
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 family), and the winged pigweed, a tumbleweedtumbleweed,
any of several plants, particularly abundant in prairie and steppe regions, that commonly break from their roots at maturity and, drying into a rounded tangle of light, stiff branches, roll before the wind, covering long distances and scattering seed as they go.
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. Pigweeds are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Caryophyllales.
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amaranth
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amaranth

amaranth

Many varieties found all over the world. Super nutritious and healthy. Whole plant is edible. Can be eaten raw or steamed. Better tasting than spinach. Has greenish, sometimes purplish colored flowers, red stem. Seeds are a world famous grain and food supply used by the Aztecs. Can be made into flour, or put into smoothies etc. Amaranth seed is high in protein, especially lysine and methionine, two essential amino acids that are not often found in grain. Very hardy plant, difficult to kill. An awesome food source. Used for stomach flu, diarrhea, gastroenteritis, excessive menstruation. Seeds better if soaked overnight. Roots can be roasted or boiled as potato alternative. Do not consume if pregnant or lactating. Toxic lookalike- hairy nightshade, whose leaves look the same but stem is hairy and has white nightshade flower.
References in periodicals archive ?
Empirical models of pigweed (Amaranthus spp.) interference in soybean (Glycine max).
In nearly every field I passed, I saw workers hacking at pigweed with hoes--a return to a once antiquated technique.
Spodoptera exigua oviposition and larval feeding preferences for pigweed, Amaranthus hybridus, over squaring cotton, Gossypium hirsutum, and a comparison of free amino acids in each host plant.
She taught her grandchildren to enjoy sweet fern tea, and when in season, cooked wild greens: pigweed, dandelion greens, milkweed, and fiddlehead ferns.
farinae), cat, dog, feather, insect mix (American and German cockroaches and fire ants), mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus), mixed grass (Bermuda, Johnson, Bahia, Salt, and Rye), tree (mix 1: Mulberry, Elm, Acacia, Cypress; mix 2: box elder, beefwood, bayberry, oak, palm, melaleuca, hackberry, sweet gum, and maple), interior and exterior mold (Rhizopus, Mucor, Pullularia, Penicillum, Aspergillus, Curvularia, Fusarium, Alternaria, Hormodendrum, Helmintospororium), and weed (mix 1: English Plantain, Pigweed, Ragweed; mix 2: marsh elder, cocklebur, lamb quarter); in addition, a histamine skin test was performed and a diluent control was included for each series.
Common weeds like shepherd's purse, chickweed, and pigweed are all edible and nutritious.
Many anglers call this vegetation "cabbage," but my dad has always called it "pigweed," because the leaves look like pig's ears.
They include setaria, halogeton, soursob (Oxalis spp.), pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), purslane (Portulaca oleracea), lamb's quarter (Chenopodium album), bassia (Bassia hyssopifolia), greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus), pigweed (Amaranthus spp.), Russian thistle (Salsola kali), sugar beets (Beta vulgaris), rhubarb (Rheum rhaponticum) and various others (Jones et al., 1970; Cheeke and Shull, 1985).
Effect of corn-induced shading on dry matter accumulation, distribution, and architecture of redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus).
For example, germination of seeds from the weeds Amaranthus (common names: Amaranth or pigweed) and Sinapis arvensis (common names: wild mustard or charlock) has been shown to be regulated by red and far-red light (Kendrick & Frankland, 1968; Frankland, 1976).
Of the three, the one-ton and two-ton rates worked best in peppermint, reducing barnyard grass, green foxtail, common lambsquarters, henbit and redroot pigweed populations by 90 percent several weeks after application.