pile


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Related to pile: Pile foundation

pile,

post of timber, steel, or concrete used to support a structure. Vertical piles, or bearing piles, the most common form, are generally needed for the foundations of bridges, docks, piers, and buildings. Slender tree trunks, roughly trimmed and about 10 in. (25.4 cm) thick at the butt, are used in foundations for houses. Wooden piles last a very long time underwater but are subject to decay when buried underground. They are shaped for driving and sometimes have a pointed iron shoe set on the sharp end, with the butt end encircled by an iron band to prevent brooming under the blows of the pile driver. Their length is usually 20 to 60 ft (6.1–18.3 m), and they are generally spaced 3 or 4 ft (.9 or 1.2 m) apart from center to center. Concrete piles are generally of two types, the precast and the cast-in-place. They are very strong and durable, do not deteriorate when wholly in the ground, and are immune to the attacks of boring insects. Precast piles are made of concrete reinforced with steel bars looped one to the other and are tipped and topped with protective steel when driven into the ground. The steel is not needed when the piles are set by the force of jets of water; in this method an iron pipe is set in the center of the pile, and water under pressure is sent down to wash away the sand, silt, or soft earth that it is to displace. Only in such subsurfaces can the water-jet system be employed. Cast-in-place piles are variously made. One method consists of driving a steel shell into the ground and filling it with concrete, after which the shell is withdrawn and the molded concrete is in place. Sheet piling consists of wooden boards or interlocking steel plates and is used largely as a cofferdam to keep water from structural work, piers, and buildings. Concrete sheet piling is also used. Pilings are driven into the ground by pile drivers using drop hammers, diesel hammers, steam hammers, or compressed-air hammers. More recently, high-powered ultrasonic vibrators have come into use for driving piles.

Pile

One of a series of large timbers or steel sections driven into soft ground down to bedrock to provide a solid foundation for the superstructure of a building.

Pile

 

a structural unit (pole or balk) that is completely or partially introduced into the ground. In most cases, piles are used in pile foundations, where they transfer a load from the structure to the soil. In addition to piles used in foundations, sheet piles, chiefly of metal, are also used in sheet-pile walls to form, for example, temporary fencing in the excavation of foundations or cofferdams in certain hydraulic-engineering installations.

Piles are classified according to methods of piling. Driven piles are prefabricated of reinforced concrete, steel, or wood and are driven into the soil by pile drivers, vibratory pile drivers, or vibratory jacking drivers. Drill-filling piles are made of concrete or reinforced concrete and are cast in place. Driven piles of reinforced concrete are most common in the USSR, accounting for more than 90 percent of the piles in use in 1973.

Reinforced-concrete driven piles usually have a square cross section. They may be solid with transverse reinforcement (3–20 m long) or solid without transverse reinforcement (3–12 m), or they may contain a cylindrical hole (3–8 m). Reinforced-concrete piles can also be round and hollow (diameter 400–800 mm, length 4–12 m). Concrete tubular piles 1,000–3,000 mm in diameter and 6–12 m long are also used. In special cases, such as tower structures, threaded steel piles are used.

With drill-filling piles, concrete is poured into a drilled shaft. The diameter of such piles is 500–1,200 mm, and the length is 10–30 m and more. To increase the load-carrying capacity, cast-in-place piles can be built with an enlarged base. Such piles are most frequently used for large loads on foundations or in cases when the layer of compact soil is deep.

REFERENCE

Osnovaniia ifundamenty: (Kratkiikurs). Moscow, 1970.

IU. G. TROFIMENKOV

pile

[pīl]
(engineering)
A long, heavy timber, steel, or reinforced concrete post that has been driven, jacked, jetted, or cast vertically into the ground to support a load.
(nucleonics)
(textiles)
Loops on a fabric surface.

pile

1. A concrete, steel, or wood column, usually less than 2 ft (0.6 m) in diameter, which is driven or otherwise introduced into the soil, usually to carry a vertical load or to provide lateral support.
2.See carpet pile.
3. A term used to indicate the number of rooms in a house from front to rear; for example, a double-pile house has two rooms between the façade and the rear wall of the house.

pile

1
1. short for voltaic pile
2. Physics a structure of uranium and a moderator used for producing atomic energy; nuclear reactor
3. Metallurgy an arrangement of wrought-iron bars that are to be heated and worked into a single bar
4. the point of an arrow

pile

2
a long column of timber, concrete, or steel that is driven into the ground to provide a foundation for a vertical load (a bearing pile) or a group of such columns to resist a horizontal load from earth or water pressure (a sheet pile)

pile

3
1. Textiles
a. the yarns in a fabric that stand up or out from the weave, as in carpeting, velvet, etc.
b. one of these yarns
2. soft fine hair, fur, wool, etc.

PILE

(1)
Polytechnic's Instructional Language for Educators. Similar in use to an enhanced PILOT, but structurally more like Pascal with Awk-like associative arrays (optionally stored on disk). Distributed to about 50 sites by Initial Teaching Alphabet Foundation for Apple II and CP/M.

["A Universal Computer Aided Instruction System," Henry G. Dietz & Ronald J Juels, Proc Natl Educ Computing Conf '83, pp.279-282].

PILE

(language, music)
["PILE _ A Language for Sound Synthesis", P. Berg, Computer Music Journal 3.1, 1979].
References in classic literature ?
And George and Tom moved to a comfortable seat in the chimney-corner, while Aunte Chloe, after baking a goodly pile of cakes, took her baby on her lap, and began alternately filling its mouth and her own, and distributing to Mose and Pete, who seemed rather to prefer eating theirs as they rolled about on the floor under the table, tickling each other, and occasionally pulling the baby's toes.
Between the crowded houses of Gravesend and the monstrous red-brick pile on the Essex shore the ship is surrendered fairly to the grasp of the river.
Some of these piles are so extensive, and so great a degree of labour and skill must have been requisite in constructing them, that I can scarcely believe they were built by the ancestors of the present inhabitants.
with his arms akimbo, so near to the flame that the smoke occasionally obscured his solemn visage, as it waved around the pile in obedience to the night airs that swept gently over the water.
It was as in a fever that I moved the pile, en bloc, on to the red.
This hole filled, he heaped a pile of fagots on it a foot in height, and set fire to it.
It is a big pile now that I have got it--I don't yet know how big--but I do not think I would go through the last fifteen or sixteen months again for it; no, not if I knew that I should come out safe at the end, pile and all.
A magnificent decadence, however, for the ancient Gothic genius, that sun which sets behind the gigantic press of Mayence, still penetrates for a while longer with its rays that whole hybrid pile of Latin arcades and Corinthian columns.
As he took each article from the walls, he placed it in a pile in the center of the room.
The Mangaboos drove the horse and the kitten and the piglets into this dark hole and then, having pushed the buggy in after them--for it seemed some of them had dragged it all the way from the domed hall--they began to pile big glass rocks within the entrance, so that the prisoners could not get out again.
At first I couldn't make out the purpose of this mighty pile of rock, unless it were intended as a rough and picturesque background for the scenes which were enacted in the arena before it, but presently, after the wooden benches had been pretty well filled by slaves and Sagoths, I discovered the purpose of the bowlders, for then the Mahars began to file into the enclosure.
Beside a charred pile of timbers the Abyssinians halted, and Tarzan, sneaking close and concealing himself in nearby shrubbery, watched them in wonderment.