pillarization

pillarization

(translation of Dutch verzuiling) a stable vertical division of society in which patterns of political organization, including trade unions as well as political parties, are determined by religious or linguistic affiliations which substantially

override or cross-cut horizontal class divisions (compare SOCIAL STRATIFICATION). In Holland, where separate Calvinist, Roman Catholic, and secular organizations exist in many spheres of life, this pattern of social organization has become highly institutionalized, the basis of a ‘segmented integration’ and shared political power. Elsewhere, however, e.g. the Lebanon and Northern Ireland, pillarization has often been associated with instability and the failure of power-sharing. See also POLITICAL CLEAVAGE, STABLE DEMOCRACY.

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He pointed out that the president would reach out to political parties to end pillarization in the country which led to the protests and arrests.
According to the logic of pillarization, which would be just one way to respect vertical pluralism, the state acknowledges various "lanes" in terms of ways of life (such as religious lanes), so that all parents will be able to benefit from public support for education without having to suffer a sizable financial penalty when they opt for religious education consistent with their values.
Interestingly pillarization has led to some bonding between the Flemish and the Walloon at one level.
50) The complex particulars of Dutch pillarization cannot be considered here.
With regard to church state traditions, pillarization greatly contributed to the idea that faith-based civil society organizations are an important aspect of a "free society," that society is inherently pluralistic and that liberal or secular organization should not be privileged or disadvantaged over religious ones, and finally that "neutrality" of the state implies the government acting in an evenhanded way toward all different denominations.
38) However, due to pillarization policy which segments Dutch society along confessional lines to keep differences between religious groups in peace, private confessional schools have the right to prohibit expressions of religious conviction if they are regarded as contrary to the religious identity of those institutions.
Taking a broader perspective, the marginal existence of radical (media) critiques in the Netherlands in the 20th century, the modest upsurge in the 1970s notwithstanding, can partly be explained by the political pressures exerted on the media to refrain from espousing radical leftwing views during pillarization (De Winter, 2004; Jos van Dijk, 2004) and by the commercial logic on which the Dutch media have operated, especially since the 1970s.
This has led to what Schrauwers has labelled the Indonesian variant of Dutch pillarization (verzuiling) or a variation of apartheid as a segmentation of society according to religious denomination.
In the Netherlands, some elements of the religious pillarization of the state remain: state-funded television channels are still allotted to Protestants and Catholics respectively.
In addition, while pillarization offers opportunities to an Indigenous middle class, at the same time it can mask extreme Indigenous stratifications.