pillory


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pillory

a wooden framework into which offenders were formerly locked by the neck and wrists and exposed to public abuse and ridicule
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
You see they had been a whole lifetime learning to appreciate the pillory; and to have that thing staring them in the face, and every one of them distinctly at the mercy of me, a stranger, if I chose to go and report -- well, it was awful, and they couldn't seem to recover from the shock, they couldn't seem to pull themselves together.
Be that as it might, the scaffold of the pillory was a point of view that revealed to Hester Prynne the entire track along which she had been treading, since her happy infancy.
"Sacrilegious wretch!" cried the high-churchman in the pillory, unable longer to restrain himself, "thou hast rejected the symbol of our holy religion!"
1986 Attractions also included a pillory, where wet sponges were thrown at assistant cub scout leader Sarah Hellewell.
Yet Jon Moss deserved a more prominent place in the refereeing pillory after he failed to award a penalty to Burnley's Sam Vokes when he was grappled by Neil Taylor in the Swansea box and refused to go down.
Ex-footballers who could not lace his boots are doing their best to pillory him.
Although I am not saying the recent incidents were the result of this, I hope people will not be so quick to pillory the bus drivers before the full facts are known.
Best of all, be taken prisoner and held in the homestead's very own 1812 reproduction pillory.
The Coleshill Pillory If you are ever tempted to wander, drunk and disorderly, around the little town of Coleshill in Warwickshire, something in Church Hill may make you pause for thought.
Others look at actions of people who created their own sort of street theater, even from the pillory, to convey their beliefs and establish their solo identity.
I do think it is unfair to pillory anyone for making mistakes."
1837: A British Act of Parliament abolished punishment by pillory.