pillory


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

pillory

a wooden framework into which offenders were formerly locked by the neck and wrists and exposed to public abuse and ridicule
References in periodicals archive ?
The Coleshill Pillory If you are ever tempted to wander, drunk and disorderly, around the little town of Coleshill in Warwickshire, something in Church Hill may make you pause for thought.
The most intriguing example of a solo performance is the case of John Lilburn, who used his time in the pillory to demonstrate his own suffering while expounding upon the beliefs that brought him there.
1837: A British Act of Parliament abolished punishment by pillory.
I do think it is unfair to pillory anyone for making mistakes.
In the word game "Pardon or Pillory," the player must guess the correct letters for the word to keep the colonist out of the pillory.
In April, when a series of retired generals hit the cable Tv circuit to pillory Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, Washington Times Editorial Page Editor Tony Blankley speculated about whether the generals had conspired to retire around the same time in order to bring down the Pentagon's head man.
4) He was found guilty, and received a sentence of undue severity: "to stand in the pillory three times, to pay a fine of 200 marks (about 134 [pounds sterling]) and to remain in Newgate until he could 'find good sureties to be of good behaviour for the space of seven years from thence'.
Occasionally he could pillory the author of a book; he became heavily involved at one point in controversy with a nun who had written a book in which she seemed to say that an apostate priest named Tyrrell was a forerunner of the Second Vatican Council.
Are they so devoid of imagination they must trawl through the trash and pillory people who have trouble enough already, as well as two innocent children ( one as yet unborn?
Maury Tamarkin recently pointed out that in James Joyce's Ulysses, some 42 per cent of the way through the nighttown chapter, the Artane orphans join hands and caper around Bloom while he is seated in a pillory.
It is thought that a number of them could relate to the tale of Roland Jenks, who in 1577 was sentenced to be nailed by his ears to the local pillory for his allegiance to the Pope in a case known as the Black Assizes.