pilot


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pilot,

person responsible for safe navigation of a ship or airplane. A ship's pilot is an individual possessing local knowledge of coastal waters. Usually licensed by public authority (in the United States, by the U.S. Coast Guard), he is taken on board to conduct a ship to or from port. The airplane pilot, in contrast to the ship's pilot, has overall command of the craft, which is operated, generally, with the assistance of a copilot. Before an airplane pilot can be licensed in the United States, he must clock a prescribed amount of solo flying experience and pass a series of tests given by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration.

Pilot

 

an official who conducts ships in dangerous and difficult waters, into and out of ports, and within harbor areas. A pilot uses a pilot vessel to reach a ship that has summoned him, boards it, and assists the navigator in piloting the ship by the safest course.

pilot

[′pī·lət]
(aerospace engineering)
A person who handles the controls of an aircraft or spacecraft from within the craft, and guides or controls the craft in flight.
A mechanical system designed to exercise control functions in an aircraft or spacecraft.
(communications)
In a transmission system, a signal wave, usually single frequency, transmitted over the system to indicate or control its characteristics.
Instructions, in tape relay, appearing in routing line, relative to the transmission or handling of that message.
(computer science)
A model of a computer system designed to test its design, logic, and data flow under operating conditions.
(design engineering)
A bullet-nosed cylindrical component used in a die that enters prepunched holes of a metal strip advancing through a series of operations to assure precise registration at each station.
(mechanical engineering)
A cylindrical steel bar extending through, and about 8 inches (20 centimeters) beyond the face of, a reaming bit; it acts as a guide that follows the original unreamed part of the borehole and hence forces the reaming bit to follow, and be concentric with, the smaller-diameter, unreamed portion of the original borehole.
(navigation)
A person who directs the movements of a vessel through pilot waters, usually a person who has demonstrated extensive knowledge of channels, aids to navigation, dangers to navigation, and so on, in a particular area and is licensed for that area.
A book of sailing directions; for waters of the United States and its possessions, the books are prepared by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, and are called coast pilots.
The person who flies aircraft.

PILOT

[′pī·lət]
(computer science)
A programming language designed for applications to computer-aided instruction and the question-and-answer type of interaction that occurs in that environment.

pilot

i. A person who handles the controls of an airplane or aircraft and, in doing so, guides it in three-dimensional flight. Especially, a person who pilots a heavier-than-air aircraft. The term can include senior pilots, command pilots, and co-pilots. The term normally refers to the first pilot as distinguished from the co-pilot; the latter usually is specifically referred to as co-pilot.
ii. To pilot. To fly an aircraft or unmanned aerial vehicle either from the ground or another aircraft.
iii. The short form of autopilot.
iv. A person licensed to operate an aircraft, glider, balloon, or airship in flight.

Pilot,

the Mr. Gray successfully carries out many assignments for the rebels and thwarts the British [Am. Lit.: Cooper The Pilot]

pilot

1. 
a. a person who is qualified to operate an aircraft or spacecraft in flight
b. (as modifier): pilot error
2. 
a. a person who is qualified to steer or guide a ship into or out of a port, river mouth, etc.
b. (as modifier): a pilot ship
3. a person who steers a ship
4. Machinery a guide, often consisting of a tongue or dowel, used to assist in joining two mating parts together
5. Machinery a plug gauge for measuring an internal diameter
6. Films a colour test strip accompanying black-and-white rushes from colour originals

PILOT

Programmed Inquiry Learning Or Teaching. CAI language, many versions. "Guide to 8080 PILOT", J. Starkweather, Dr Dobb's J (Apr 1977).

PILOT

(1) (Programmed Inquiry Learning Or Teaching) A high-level programming language used to generate question-and-answer courseware. A version that incorporated turtle graphics ran on Atari computers.

(2) (Pilot Software, Cambridge, MA, www.pilotsoftware.com) A corporate provider of business analytics solutions whose technologies included PilotWorks Suite, a business intelligence product with more than 15 years of development, and Pilot Hit List, which is software for website reporting and analysis. In early 2007, Hit List was acquired by Web analytics company Marketwave, and shortly thereafter, Pilot itself was acquired by SAP.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cessna 210A in which Crossfield died was a puny flying machine compared with the rocket-powered aircraft he flew as a test pilot.
At 2045, upon learning the destination ship was unable to provide an NVD-capable platform, the pilot directed the crew to remove their NVDs and transition to white lighting.
An aircraft can be designed with an electronic flight control system that gives the pilot a positive, stable, handling-qualities feel while the aircraft is unstable (Baer & Landy, 1987).
At at least a half-dozen flight schools across the country, an increasing number of top executives and other adventure-seekers are lining up to become combat pilots for a day.
OMNNI Associates of Appleton, Wisconsin, USA, handled most engineering, control system retrofit, and drive design of the modern, high-speed pilot coater acquired primarily from the Boise Cascade research facility in Portland, Oregon.
Problems related to pilot disorientation were reported as far back as World War I, (7) and these problems have persisted well into the space shuttle era.
Michael's reference to the three-state test refers to the three-year-long MTMC pilot that handled approximately half of all eligible military outbound moves in North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida.
The striking pilots also say that companies ask them to violate federal laws.
At the beginning of a roll, for instance, the pilot pulls up the nose about 10 degrees by flipping up hinged panels called elevators on the plane's tail.
WASHINGTON, March 18 /PRNewswire/ -- The union representing Piedmont Airlines pilots today said that a strike by the USAir Express carrier's pilots could affect most of the USAir system.
As soon as a pilot launches one he can peel away and let the missile worry about itself.
Founded in 1963, the Allied Pilots Association -- the largest independent pilot union in the U.