pilot light

(redirected from pilot lights)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

pilot light

1. a small auxiliary flame that ignites the main burner of a gas appliance when the control valve opens
2. a small electric light used as an indicator

pilot light

[′pī·lət ‚līt]
(electricity)
(engineering)
A small, constantly burning flame used to ignite a gas burner.

pilot light

1. A light which is associated with and indicative of the operation of a circuit, control, or device.
2. A small flame (which burns constantly) used to ignite the burner in a gas appliance.
References in periodicals archive ?
WORCESTER - When San Jose general manager Doug Wilson was in town two weeks ago, the topic of veteran players came up, and at one point the GM said, "Sometimes, with veterans, the pilot light goes out.
It appeared to be ignited by a pilot light in the apartment, Humphrey said.
Higher efficient furnaces without pilot lights require the flame sensor to be cleaned and checked;
She said crews were going to customers' homes last night to help them re-light pilot lights.
No one was injured, but campers were roused and asked to shut off the pilot lights in their recreational vehicles because of a damaged propane tank.
Excessive soot, flames burning yellow and pilot lights blowing out regularly may indicate a fault.
Those using pilot lights will pay firm gas rates to run them and will not be penalized.
Next, Peoples Gas crews will visit each customer premise and insure natural gas service is restored, pilot lights will be re-lit and safety checks will be completed by a representative of Peoples Gas.
Northwest Natural asked its customers not to relight their own pilot lights.
Simplified connection of devices such as pilot lights, limit switches and push buttons to control systems and the elimination of individual wiring runs from distant locations.
and Washington Gas has visited most customers in the area to restore service to their homes by relighting their furnace pilot lights.
Moving to a tankless design helps water heater manufacturers avoid the persistent problems that have plagued water heaters since the 1800s, such as Legionaries disease which resembles flu symptoms but can cause death; sediment deposits that shorten water tank life cycles and impede energy efficiency; tank ruptures that cause severe flooding; very hot water temperatures that could scald infants or elderly family members and sometimes lead to accidental death; and accidental fires with gas water heaters that are caused by pilot lights igniting flammable substances such as gasoline.