pinch

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pinch

1. the quantity of a substance, such as salt, that can be taken between a thumb and finger
2. a very small quantity
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pinch

[pinch]
(engineering)
The closing-in of borehole walls before casing is emplaced, resulting from rock failure when drilling in formations having a low compressional strength.
(geology)
Thinning of a rock layer, as where a vein narrows.
(mining engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It wanted to pinch pennies. In the end, USA Today shuttered its TV section just as The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times were beginning to push more in that direction.
If you wish to pinch pennies, there is the standard 143bhp diesel engine, which while not really a rubber burner, will reward you with 16.5kmpl, making the A4 cheaper to run than a Tata Nano.
He drove a Volkswagen until his wife decided it was bad for his image and upgraded him to a Cadillac." There you have it folks- if you want to join the billionaire club, you could just pinch pennies like the mighty Buffett.
Adam said: "In times like these, we should be doing everything that we can to save waste and pinch pennies. Love Food Hate Waste is such a fantastic initiative we wanted to do our bit to show Liverpool what you can do with things you thought were long gone and get them back in the kitchen."
But business travelers are hitting the road with a mind to pinch pennies by flying coach, cutting back on meals and even sharing hotel rooms with colleagues, according to a new survey of 700 business travelers nationwide.
While Marvel had to pinch pennies, given that it was putting its own dollars on the line, it could wind up spending more in the future now that it has the Mouse House's money to play with.
The resale business, which includes thrift and consignment shops, is booming as consumers, who have lost their jobs or watched the values of their investment portfolio or homes plummet, look for ways to pinch pennies. Even those people whose jobs havenAAEt been hurt have become more price conscious.