pineapple guava


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pineapple guava

pineapple guava

Looks like a cross between an avocado and a green lumpy chicken egg. The flavor is sweet and tropical, like a papaya melony thing. Juicy flesh divided into clear gelatinous gooey seed pulp. Flesh is firmer and slightly gritty closer to the skin. Can be eaten with a spoon. Great in smoothies. Sweet cinnamon-tasting flowers also edible.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz
References in periodicals archive ?
Pineapple guava fruits were harvested when they reached physiological maturity in two production areas located within the Department of Cundinamarca, Colombia.
Because pineapple guava is a perennial crop, 10 trees per elemental plot and 2 plots per site were used, resulting in a total of 40 trees in this study.
gloeosporioides isolates from apple appears in the same ramification of the Group II, which is also founded in the branch of the Group III of pineapple guava isolates (Figure 1).
Low-Maintenance Edibles for Southern California Alpine strawberry Olive Carob Persimmon, Oriental Chayote Pineapple guava Fig Pine nut Jujuba Pomegranate Kiwi Prickly pear Lemon guava Sapote Loquat Strawberry guava Mulberry Natal plum How to Create Edible Landscapes in a Community
Exotic and tangy-sweet, the flavor of pineapple guava fruit may remind you of a tropical paradise.
Pineapple guava and strawberry guava are two related but distincly different plants--and April's a good time to plant either one.
The results (which they've documented on their blog, drinkablegarden.com) were so good that they planted part of the driveway with lemon, mandarin orange, and pomegranate trees, plus blueberries, carrots, pineapple guavas, and more.
* THE FIND Impossible to choose just one, with so many when-in Hawaii products: Kukui's Portuguese sausage; just-caught, grilled-to order Kona abalone; and swaths of subtropical fruit, including fresh, silky litchi, juicy pineapple guavas, and super-sweet sugar pineapples.
Elliptical, olive-green feijoas, increasingly available in markets, may remind you of the small pineapple guavas that grow in many Western gardens.