pinhole camera

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pinhole camera

[′pin‚hōl ′kam·rə]
(optics)
A camera which has no lenses, but consists essentially of a darkened box with a small hole in one side, so that an inverted image of outside objects is projected on the opposite side where it is recorded on photographic film.
References in periodicals archive ?
In essence, the pinhole camera pulls from our past (see Grepstad, 1996, for an historical account of pinhole photography).
Here the Paris-based artist has taken his pinhole camera to the French capital's financial district.
He created a pinhole camera by placing aluminum foil over a tiny hole one fifth of a millimetre wide on the film cartridge.
Pinhole cameras typically evoke an idyllic childhood pastime: matchboxes, a needle, sunny days, and curiosity.
Subjects at previous events have ranged from pinhole cameras and the science of cakes to the politics of North Korea and the history of drag artists.
The Centre for Life in Newcastle is giving away 100 pinhole cameras made from drinks cans and tape to individuals, companies or organisations who will select a location and subject.
NEVSEHIR, Apr 27, 2010 (TUR) -- A Turkish teacher opened on Tuesday an individual exhibition of her collection of photographs taken through pinhole cameras she made from cans and cardboard boxes.
Unlike most contemporary photographers who rely on the latest technology, Mikula has chosen to go back in time, using antiquated techniques and tools like pinhole cameras and Polaroid film to create her pieces.
From a beginner's introduction to pinhole cameras to expanded information and zone plate practices for more advanced users, this is packed with color photos of the latest, most original pinhole results.
Nowadays, people like to use pinhole cameras because they're a technological throwback to earlier times.
With plenty of examples and illustrations they describe image acquisition theories and techniques, including electromagnetic radiation, the interaction of light and matter, lenses, pinhole cameras, Gaussian optics, lens aberrations, cameras, sensors and color cameras, camera performance, camera-computer interfaces, and analog and digital video signals; machine vision algorithms, including fundamental data structures, images, regions, gray value transformations, projective transformations, feature extraction, region morphology, edge extraction in 1D and 2D, fitting lines and circles, camera calibration and stereo recognition; and machine vision applications, including wafer dicing, inspections, measurement in difficult situations and even classification of non-woven fabrics.
Pinhole cameras were placed into the ceiling panels to record the pin numbers entered into the card machine on the counter by unsuspecting customers.