pink noise


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pink noise

[′piŋk ‚nōiz]
(acoustics)
Noise whose intensity is inversely proportional to frequency over a specified range, to give constant energy per octave.

pink noise

A random signal of every frequency in the audio spectrum, in which each higher octave drops off 3 dB. The lower octaves have more power, and the higher octaves have less power. Pink noise is generated to test loudspeakers in a room as well as to "tune" a room for best audio reproduction.

Also known as "1/f noise," pink noise patterns have been found in music melodies, semiconductors and atomic clocks. They are also found in nature, including the sounds of wind and waterfalls. Contrast with white noise and Gaussian noise.
References in periodicals archive ?
Events will include a screening by art group Protocinema, a pink noise generating device by Philippe Pasquier and performances by Njootli and Tran.
Next time you're having trouble drifting off, try filling your room with the sounds of waves lapping on the beach or leaves rustling in the trees - these are nature's pink noise creators (there are lots of apps where
The purpose of this combination of white and pink noise was to reduce the incidence of front-back confusions by enabling the listener to differentiate the direction of source, based on the spectral profile of the sound.
The noise power spectrum of the pink noise in X([omega])[X.
With babble noise, the mean durations over 61 subjects were 143, ms (SD 37 ms) and 349 ms (SD 76 ms), and correspondingly with pink noise, 130 ms (SD 32 ms) and 341 ms (SD 79 ms).
4) For an analysis of Pink Noise, see my essay "Toward a Poetics of Noise: From Hu Shi to Hsia Yii," Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews 30 (2008), 167-78.
Similarly, band-averaged ERLs using pink noise spectra will more closely correspond to the continuous analytic result than will band-averaged ERLs with white noise.
Figure 3 uses a different scale, because I use pink noise to do the free-field RTA, and have to drive the speaker hard for sustained periods to do averaging, and I lower the scale to protect both the tweeter and my own well being.
The noise-spectrum independent variable included two low-frequency-biased noises, pink noise (flat-by-octaves between 63 and 8000 Hz) and red noise (more low-frequency biased, with a -3 dB/octave slope and a C minus A value of 9 dB; see Figure 1).
Wright says: "It is sometimes called white noise or pink noise and this idea of muffled conversation seems to be very much in the same vein.