pinned joint

pinned joint

A joint that is secured by the use of wood dowels rather than by wedges.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the flexible intermediate link is pinned to joint [B.sub.i], the deformation of the pinned joint is zero according to [24, 25].
The normal stresses [[sigma].sub.x] and [[sigma].sub.y] in the stone masonry of the bridge vault with the breast walls coupled to the 0,2 m thick concrete slab by means of a pinned joint, there is a growth in the stress state of the actual vault stone masonry of 20 to 40%.
In case of the bridge vault interacting with the breast walls coupled by a pinned joint with the reinforcement concrete slab tie, as compared to the case when the rotation effect in the footing bottom is resisted only by the bridge vaults, the normal stresses [[sigma].sub.x] and [[sigma].sub.y] in the vault stone masonry reach values of several times higher.
Should the L-shaped front post to side rail joint fail, it would become, in effect, a pinned joint. Nonetheless, it would be held in place by the round tenon of the front rail that mates with it and passes through its center.
"When examining the motion of the mechanism, I realized that the pinned joints in the linkage rotated through an extremely small angle, therefore a flexural linkage would easily offer the same functionality at a highly reduced part count," says Begg.
The system comprises of 3 metre sections weighing less then 120 kg and 1 metre long cross beams that are attached with pinned joints at every metre.
Treatment of selected semirigid joints as pinned joints (with respect to moment) in braced frames may provide useful deflection estimates when the semirigid behavior of cross brace joints with respect to axial forces is known.
In tests, pallet sections with fixed joints had a higher frequency than sections with pinned joints.
Overall, these, as well as the other cross pinned joints included in the study failed owing to longitudinal shear failures within the tenon.
Thus, the chairs with pinned joints were 518/608, or 85 percent as strong as the unpinned.
The results presented in both Figures 5 and 6, show that the pinned joints develop only a fraction of the capacity of the glued joints.
As can be seen in Figure 6, the pinned joints had significantly less moment capacity than the unpinned, i.e., on average, the pinned red oak joints had 67 percent and the pinned yellow-poplar joints had 62 percent of the capacity of the corresponding unpinned joints.