pint


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English units of measurement

English units of measurement, principal system of weights and measures used in a few nations, the only major industrial one being the United States. It actually consists of two related systems—the U.S. Customary System of units, used in the United States and dependencies, and the British Imperial System. The names of the units and the relationships between them are generally the same in both systems, but the sizes of the units differ, sometimes considerably.

Customary Units of Weights and Measures

Units of Weight

The pound (lb) is the basic unit of weight (which is proportional to mass). Within the English units of measurement there are three different systems of weights. In the avoirdupois system, the most widely used of the three, the pound is divided into 16 ounces (oz) and the ounce into 16 drams. The ton, used to measure large masses, is equal to 2,000 lb (short ton) or 2,240 lb (long ton). In Great Britain the stone, equal to 14 lb, is also used. The troy system (named for Troyes, France, where it is said to have originated) is used only for precious metals. The troy pound is divided into 12 ounces and the troy ounce into 20 pennyweights or 480 grains; the troy pound is thus 5,760 grains. The grain is also a unit in the avoirdupois system, 1 avoirdupois pound being 7,000 grains, so that the troy pound is 5,760/7,000 of an avoirdupois pound. Apothecaries' weights are based on troy weights; in addition to the pound, ounce, and grain, which are equal to the troy units of the same name, other units are the dram (1/8 oz) and the scruple (1/24 oz or 1/3 dram).

Units of Length and Area

The basic unit of length is the yard (yd); fractions of the yard are the inch (1/36 yd) and the foot (1/3 yd), and commonly used multiples are the rod (51-2 yd), the furlong (220 yd), and the mile (1,760 yd). The acre, equal to 4,840 square yards or 160 square rods, is used for measuring land area.

Units of Liquid Measure

For liquid measure, or liquid capacity, the basic unit is the gallon, which is divided into 4 quarts, 8 pints, or 32 gills. The U.S. gallon, or wine gallon, is 231 cubic inches (cu in.); the British imperial gallon is the volume of 10 lb of pure water at 62℉ and is equal to 277.42 cu in. The British units of liquid capacity are thus about 20% larger than the corresponding American units. The U.S. fluid ounce is 1/16 of a U.S. pint; the British unit of the same name is 1/20 of an imperial pint and is thus slightly smaller than the U.S. fluid ounce.

Units of Dry Measure

For dry measure, or dry capacity, the basic unit is the bushel, which is divided into 4 pecks, 32 dry quarts, or 64 dry pints. The U.S. bushel, or Winchester bushel, is 2,150.42 cu in. and is about 3% smaller than the British imperial bushel of 2,219.36 cu in., with a similar difference existing between U.S. and British subdivisions. The barrel is a unit for measuring the capacity of larger quantities and has various legal definitions depending on the quantity being measured, the most common value being 105 dry quarts.

Differences between American and British Systems

Many American units of weights and measures are based on units in use in Great Britain before 1824, when the British Imperial System was established. Since the Mendenhall Order of 1893, the U.S. yard and pound and all other units derived from them have been defined in terms of the metric units of length and mass, the meter and the kilogram; thus, there was no longer any direct relationship between American units and British units of the same name. In 1959 an international agreement was reached among English-speaking nations to use the same metric equivalents for the yard and pound for purposes of science and technology; these values are 1 yd=0.9144 meter (m) and 1 lb=0.45359237 kilogram (kg). In the United States, the older definition of the yard as 3,600/3,937 m has continued to be used in many instances for surveying, the corresponding foot (1,200/3,937 m) being known as the survey foot; the survey foot will become obsolete in 2023.

The English units of measurement have many drawbacks: the complexity of converting from one unit to another, the differences between American and British units, the use of the same name for different units (e.g., ounce for both weight and liquid capacity, quart and pint for both liquid and dry capacity), and the existence of three different systems of weights (avoirdupois, troy, and apothecaries'). Because of these disadvantages and because of the wide use of the much simpler metric system in most other parts of the world, there have been proposals to do away with the U.S. Customary System and replace it with the metric system.

Bibliography

See L. J. Chisholm, Units of Weights and Measure: International and U.S. Customary (U.S. National Bureau of Standards, 1967).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pint

 

a unit of volume (capacity) of liquids and dry commodities used in countries employing the English system of measures. In Great Britain 1 pint = 1/8 gallon = 0.568261 dm3. In the United States a distinction is made between the liquid pint, equal to 1/8 American gallon (0.473179 dm3), and the dry pint, equal to 1/64 American bushel (0.550614 dm3). The pint was also used in other countries before they adopted the metric system (for example, in France 1 pint = 0.931389 dm3, and in the Netherlands 1 pint = 0.6063 dm3).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pint

[pīnt]
(mechanics)
Abbreviated pt.
A unit of volume, used in the United States for measurement of liquid substances, equal to 1/8 U.S. gallon, or 231/8 cubic inches, or 4.73176473 × 10-4 cubic meter. Also known as liquid pint (liq pt).
A unit of volume used in the United States for measurement of solid substances, equal to 1/64 U.S. bushel, or 107,521/3200 cubic inches, or approximately 5.50610 × 10-4 cubic meter. Also known as dry pint (dry pt).
A unit of volume, used in the United Kingdom for measurement of liquid and solid substances, although usually the former, equal to 1/8 imperial gallon, or 5.6826125 × 10-4 cubic meter. Also known as imperial pint.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pint

1. a unit of liquid measure of capacity equal to one eighth of a gallon. 1 Brit pint is equal to 0.568 litre, 1 US pint to 0.473 litre
2. a unit of dry measure of capacity equal to one half of a quart. 1 US dry pint is equal to one sixty-fourth of a US bushel or 0.5506 litre
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The most expensive European city on the list is Oslo, Norway, where a pint will set you back [pounds sterling]8 on average.
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In Huddersfield town centre drinkers are fortunate to have two Wetherspoon pubs, The Cherry Tree and The Lord Wilson, which serve a selection of quality real ales at PS2.35 a pint and upwards.
Cheapest pints: PS1.95 for lager, PS1.99 for bitter.
The cheapest place for a pint in the UK was Leeds with London unsurprisingly most expensive.
The average price of a Premier League pint - varying from Carlsberg to Singha - stands at PS4.07.
North Bergen, NJ-based Vitamin Shoppe has launched pint, a new line of herbal supplements made with natural botanical ingredients available exclusively at Vitamin Shoppe stores nationwide and online.
A Sunday Mail survey reveals supermarkets are milking it as consumers can now pay up to 80 per cent more for a pint, depending on where they shop.
You have been discussing the drop in the price of a pint MJJ1970 said: "I fail to see how a 1p per pint saving will make any difference at all.
London, October 20 ( ANI ): Researchers claim to have cracked the code behind what makes a perfect pint.