piperine


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piperine

[′pip·ə‚rēn]
(organic chemistry)
C17H19NO3 A crystalline compound that is found in black pepper; melting point is 130°C; soluble in benzene and acetic acid; used to give a pungent taste to brandy and as an insecticide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Piperine inhibits the growth and motility of triple-negative breast cancer cells.
A study published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry says that the main substance in black pepper, known as piperine, can stop the formation of new fat cells.
3) Ginger: Is a great ingredient to use because it has gingerols, capsaicin, and piperine - compounds that boost metabolism (they also supposedly have an aphrodisiac effect).
The bioenhancers such as piperine and curcumin enhance the theraputic efficacy of MTX.
Targeting breast stem cells with the cancer preventive compounds curcumin and piperine.
One note: Try to pair your turmeric with some black pepper, which will help increase absorption, and if you opt for a supplement, look for one with piperine or black pepper extract.
A preliminary new study suggests that the pungent component in black pepper known as piperine fights fat by blocking the formation of new fat cells, Health News reported.
The research pinpoints piperine - the pungent-tasting substance that gives black pepper its characteristic taste, concluding that piperine also can block the formation of new fat cells.
Spiciness of pepper is due to the chemical piperine in it.
The beneficial physiological effects of the three common spices--turmeric (Curcuma longa), red pepper (Capsicum annuum) and black pepper (Piper nigrum) are incidentally attributable to their respective active principles--curcumin (yellow colouring compound of turmeric), capsaicin (pungent principle of red pepper) and piperine (the biting principle of black pepper) (1).
Anticonvulsant activity of piperine on seizures induced by excitatory amino acid receptor agonists.