pirouette

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pirouette

a body spin, esp in dancing, on the toes or the ball of the foot

Pirouette

 

a ballet term designating a full turn or multiple full turns executed in place by a male or female dancer. Rotation may be clockwise or counterclockwise. A pirouette is executed by a variety of means that create a spinning motion. A dancer can execute a series of pirouettes moving in a straight line or a circle.

References in periodicals archive ?
Levimoon hopes to raise $6,373 via Kickstarter campaign to bring its innovative new series of planet lamps - Pirouette, that can spin perpetually with no visible docking
Davo and Fegarido exerted great effort to engage every muscle to defy gravity and throw in an extra pirouette or scissored jumps.
It is unclear whether expert turners tend to remain closer to equilibrium during pirouettes or if they have the strength to tolerate (and perhaps regain balance from) larger maximum [theta].
We know Mel We know Mel is a good mover and quite the fitness fan (have you seen her washboard stomach?) but she looks more like she is off to dance class to practise her pirouettes than someone about to film one of the highest profile shows on TV.
Maybe you are falling out of pirouettes, your turns have a jerky rhythm, or you carry so much tension in your neck that you can't do multiples.
You are determined to achieve multiple pirouettes. What do you typically think about or focus on JUST BEFORE executing a multiple pirouette?
PIROUETTES FOR PENNIES: Penny-drives are a great way to help send dancers to competitions.
The British star found performing spins and pirouettes made her want to be ill and GMTV weathergirl Andrea McLean has had similar complaints.
They have been practising their pirouettes and pliAs for months.
His feat, which saw him reach the equivalent height of a 12-storey building, lasted just 26 seconds but allowed enough time for a couple of pirouettes.
In Arce's recent seven-year survey, the Mexican painter's early multipaneled works display narratives of cross-fertilization through omnifarious and often unpredictable stylistic pirouettes. The "Alfonso Michel Series," 1994, of which thirteen parts were shown here, could be described as a morphing of a painting from the '30s by the eponymous Mexican metaphysical artist into a funky '70s Guston.
For instance, how should you approach pirouettes, contractions, and back bends?