piscatorial

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piscatorial

, piscatory
1. of or relating to fish, fishing, or fishermen
2. devoted to fishing
References in periodicals archive ?
The generous portion of fishcakes were the pick of the starters, with a fine balance of flavours and a pleasant textual contrast between the crispy coating and the softer piscatory mash inside.
Both authors incorporate elements from different sources: Camoes's piscatory eclogue and Bernardes's Ecloga XIII are set in nocturnal scenery (as is Sannazaro's) and both use the verb "arder" to describe the fisherman's feelings (as in Virgil); Bernardes's other two eclogues place the lover on a promontory, alluding to Polyphemus in Theocritus (Idyll XI, ll.
She makes good use of the link to emphasize the 'brooding, resentful and revenge-driven' aspect of Walton's piscatory idyll (p.
Sannazaro deserves the attention he has been given here, as the author of major neo-Latin poems like Departu virginis and an important cycle of piscatory eclogues and as a major figure in Quattrocento Neapolitan culture.
In a written decision awarding the woman $75, Judge Travers said her $1,250 asking price "must be viewed, as with many tales of piscatory acquisition, somewhat inflated by the passage of time."
of Oxford, UK) and Piscatory (fellow, Wadham College, Oxford, UK) address a range of issues related to culture and identity for populations of the Arab states of the Gulf.
notable that they invoke piscatory ecloques: texts in which the
The overall plot is disclosed as one of "symbolic death and rebirth" (10), for "death and decadence accompany life and growth in all earthly settings: the hunt, the bucolic, the rustic, the piscatory, the courtly" (17).
It was Charles Darwin who preached the doctrine of 'living fossils', and this fish, jocularly christened 'Old Fourlegs', known in its scientific dignity as Latimeria chalumnae, caught off the coast of East London, South Africa, just before Christmas 1938, was not only a wonderful piscatory prize, but also indubitably the greatest scientific find of the twentieth century.
Conversely, Justice O'Connor is willing to expansively read the property owner's rights to include the right to "`build on his tidal land so as to exclude [the] public completely as long as he does not unreasonably interfere with navigation.'"(212) If the public trust doctrine is flexible enough to include the use of pleasure water crafts as a modern form of navigation, then piscatory, the art of taking fish from the ocean,(213) would seem to be broad enough to encompass aquaculture, an ancient form of producing fish.