piscicide


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piscicide

[′pis·ə‚sīd]
(materials)
A substance capable of killing fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
The choice to conduct a rotenone application is largely driven by previous experience with the application of this piscicide, knowledge of the water body and available funding.
The two main commercial uses of rotenone today are as a piscicide and as an insecticide.
If used as a piscicide it may also cause a temporary decrease in numbers of other aquatic organisms (Blommaert 1950,, Bourgois 1989, Bossard 1993).
Angolan medicinal plants used also as piscicides and/or soaps.
Toxicants from mangrove plants, VI: Heritonin, anew piscicide from the mangrove plant Heritiera littoralis.
For instance, Ceratophyllum plants protect themselves from herbivores by unidentified repellent substances (Bronmark, 1985), and aquatic plants of several genera--Lyonia, for example--produce effective hemolytic piscicides (Bhatt & Farswan, 1992).
However, jermal fishing, use of industrial piscicides or surrogate chemicals, and forest burning are not sustainable and will ultimately adversely affect all land uses, in one time scale or another.
the piscicide Rotenone and the use of motorized equipment .
While rotenone is an effective piscicide, Sanders and Cope (1968) suggests that non-target invertebrate organisms may have even lower tolerance.
Piscicides are often used to control competing species in fish production especially in small water bodies/enclosures, eradicate fish to control parasites, and conserve or restore native species but their uses are not encouraged because of their toxicity to aquatic organisms and the degradation of the environment.
Rotenone is the most widely used piscicides in the U SA and its toxicity to North American fishes is well documented [1].