piscicide


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piscicide

[′pis·ə‚sīd]
(materials)
A substance capable of killing fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lakes were drawn down and then treated with rotenone, a non-selective piscicide (fish poison).
Beginning on Monday, August 21 and continuing through September 30, biologists will use rotenone, a piscicide (fish toxin) to remove fish in the upper Gibbon River drainage.
05) glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase activities in the liver in both concentrations of the piscicide.
Rotenone--a natural compound used as an insecticide, piscicide, and pesticide--and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)--a neurotoxin precursor of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ([MPP.
Subsequent to this time, the use of a piscicide and concerns of potential impacts to non-target components of the aquatic community were questioned and many entities have limited the use of rotenone.
Today a chemical piscicide, known as Rotenone, will be released into the waters to remove the gudgeon population.
rotenone (a naturally occurring broadspectrum piscicide, herbicide, and
The agency is trying to eradicate a population of topmouth gudgeon in two lakes at the Millennium Coastal Park by applying a chemical called piscicide.
This wire-ring-bound manual provides fishery managers and others with safety procedures needed for carrying out restoration projects with rotenone, a piscicide, while meeting existing laws and regulations of all regulatory jurisdictions.
The poison used in Chicago was rotenone, a broad-spectrum piscicide (as well as insecticide and pesticide)--2,200 gallons over a five-day period.
After looking at a number of possible solutions, DEC determined the best chance of successfully eliminating this aggressive invasive was to treat the pond with rotenone, a piscicide (fish killer) derived from Amazonian plants.
In Angola it is one of the medicinal plants used as a piscicide, anthelminthic, insecticide and for treating tuberculosis (Bossard 1993), and as a bactericide (Roark 1937).