piston skirt

piston skirt

[′pis·tən ‚skərt]
(mechanical engineering)
That part of a piston below the piston pin bore.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore the piston (Figure 8, left side) is equipped with 12 measurement sensors which ensure that a temperature gradient from the piston crown to the piston skirt is measurable and useful for the inverse temperature field determination.
The piston skirt displayed signatures of thermal expansion, scoring and material transfer.
Meanwhile, the piston's reciprocating movement eliminates side forces between piston rings, piston skirt and the cylinder wall, ensuring that the LICELGIS friction loss is reduced and mechanical efficiency is raised.
But for the piston design and production enterprises, after decades of accumulated research and development, they have formed a series of products; have accumulated a wealth of experience and processes in design requirements, structures, feature selection, performance analysis, and so on; have a great deal of successful examples in piston skirt, combustion chamber, cavity and other structures which are difficult to design.
They've also done things to reduce friction, like using a roller timing chain and using a CrN-PVD coating for the top ring on the piston and an MoS, coating on the piston skirt.
Among specific topics are the dynamics of a single elastic body under large rigid rotation, predicting nonlinear contact force of piston skirt and cylinder liner under the function of clap force, the reliability analysis of an arch dam considering temperature change field, a comparison and analysis of permafrost railway subgrade settlement deformation monitoring, and the real-time monitoring of stress in marine derricks based on environmental loads.
You have the potential for piston skirt scuffing because the piston skirt goes out past the bottom of the cylinder walls on some engines.
The pistons have an offset piston pin and extended piston skirt that reduces piston slap and thus engine noise levels, Sugar said.
The tool (Farm Collector, May 2005, page 4) is a piston skirt expander.
The piston skirt accounts for the rest and is another area that the MIT researchers are evaluating.
The lines of unit pressure, acting in horizontal planes because they must be normal to surfaces, force the diaphragm against the piston and cylinder sidewalls on that portion of the diaphragm in contact with the cylinder wall and piston skirt.
At the second station, a horizontal feed unit with a boring spindle drills the wrist-pin hole and counterbores, faces, and chamfers (grooves) the piston skirt.