pitch attitude

pitch attitude

[′pich ‚ad·ə‚tüd]
(mechanics)
The attitude of an aircraft, rocket, or other flying vehicle, referred to the relationship between the longitudinal body axis and a chosen reference line or plane as seen from the side.

pitch attitude

pitch attitude
The angle between the longitudinal axis of an aircraft and a defined reference plane (e.g., local horizontal).
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the things we learn as primary students is how increasing or decreasing engine power affects an airplane's pitch attitude (there are other reactions, of course, but we want to focus here on pitch).
"The conventional artificial horizon provides a direct reading indication of the bank and pitch attitude of the aircraft which is accurately indicated by a miniature aircraft pictorially displayed against a horizon bar and as if observed from the rear.
The first officer successfully transited the first part of the microburst encounter by rotating the airplane above a 15[degrees] nose-up pitch attitude and by increasing engine thrust to almost takeoff power.
The system can do this because it knows altitude, heading and even pitch attitude. That's all the information it needs.
One of the targets of a pitch control system is to control or help a pilot to control an aircraft to keep the pitch attitude constant, that is, make the aircraft return to desired attitude in a reasonable length of time after a disturbance of the pitch angle, or make the pitch follow a given command as quickly as possible [11].
"Shortly thereafter the helicopter, which was intact, struck the sea in a near level pitch attitude with a slight right bank."
Everybody knew about a low speed instability problem on takeoff--all pilots on their first takeoff experienced severe up and down changes to pitch attitude in quick succession, something they called it the "JC" maneuver.
"He responded by reducing the pitch attitude, which allowed the aircraft to accelerate to a safe climb speed."
The last recorded values were a vertical speed of -10,912ft/min, a ground speed of 107 kt and a pitch attitude of 16.2 degrees nose-up.
However, in the IndiGo flight's case, the pilot gave a negative pitch attitude and reduced the angle to 3.8 degrees resulting in the aircraft landing on the NLG.
Without the landing gear extended and with no trailing edge flaps the pitch attitude would have already been very nose high.
To ensure uneventful flights, and erratic pitch attitude, check out TB 1-1520-240-20-107 for the details.