pitch attitude

pitch attitude

[′pich ‚ad·ə‚tüd]
(mechanics)
The attitude of an aircraft, rocket, or other flying vehicle, referred to the relationship between the longitudinal body axis and a chosen reference line or plane as seen from the side.

pitch attitude

pitch attitude
The angle between the longitudinal axis of an aircraft and a defined reference plane (e.g., local horizontal).
References in periodicals archive ?
being equal, a specific power setting and a certain pitch attitude will return the same airspeed and rate of climb/descent every time.
Shortly thereafter the helicopter, which was intact, struck the sea in a near level pitch attitude with a slight right bank.
Everybody knew about a low speed instability problem on takeoff--all pilots on their first takeoff experienced severe up and down changes to pitch attitude in quick succession, something they called it the "JC" maneuver.
He responded by reducing the pitch attitude, which allowed the aircraft to accelerate to a safe climb speed.
They have a pretty good idea of power settings, but not the pitch attitude that goes with them," says Doug Stewart, CFI, DPE and president of the Society of Aviation and Flight Educators (SAFE).
The last recorded values were a vertical speed of -10,912ft/min, a ground speed of 107 kt and a pitch attitude of 16.
However, in the IndiGo flight's case, the pilot gave a negative pitch attitude and reduced the angle to 3.
Without the landing gear extended and with no trailing edge flaps the pitch attitude would have already been very nose high.
To ensure uneventful flights, and erratic pitch attitude, check out TB 1-1520-240-20-107 for the details.
The function of the stabilator is to control the Black Hawk's pitch attitude in flight.
The pilot initiated a waveoff, selecting military power with slightly less than a 10-degree pitch attitude while trimming nose down.