pitcher plant


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pitcher plant,

any of several insectivorous plants with leaves adapted for trapping insects. Each leaf forms a "pitcher," a somewhat trumpet-shaped enclosure, usually containing a liquid. An insect that enters, lured by nectar and sometimes by brilliant coloration, is prevented from retreating by deflexed bristles and ultimately is drowned in the fluid. The trapped insects are apparently digested by plant enzymes and perhaps by bacteria present in the collected rainwater solution. There are three families of pitcher plants. The American family (the Sarraceniaceae) comprises three genera of bog plants, Sarracenia of E North America, Darlingtonia of N California and adjacent Oregon (the single species is D. californica), and Heliamphora of N South America. The common pitcher plant, or side-saddle flower (S. purpurea), is found in bogs from Labrador to Florida and Iowa. The Nepenthaceae, an Old World tropical family, ranging from China to Australia and Pacifica and found chiefly in Borneo, consists of the single genus Nepenthes. Many of its species and hybrids, sometimes also called monkey cups, are cultivated as novelties for their large and showy pendent pitchers. The largest pitchers are found in Nepenthes species, some of which are apparently modified to attract small mammals to feed on their nectar so that the pitchers can catch the animals' feces. The Australian pitcher plant (Cephalotus follicularis) is the single species of the family Cephalotaceae. The bottom leaves of its low rosette are modified into brightly colored, slipper-shaped receptacles with lids and teeth. Other insectivorous plants include the bladderwortbladderwort
, any plant of the genus Utricularia, insectivorous or carnivorous aquatic plants, many native to North America. Small animals are caught and digested in bladderlike organs of the finely divided submerged leaves.
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, butterwort, Venus's-flytrapVenus's-flytrap,
insectivorous or carnivorous bog plant (Dionaea muscipula) native to the Carolina savannas and now widely cultivated as a novelty. The leaves, borne in a low rosette, resemble bear traps.
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, and sundew.

pitcher plant

[′pich·ər ‚plant]
(botany)
Any of various insectivorous plants of the families Sarraceniaceae and Nepenthaceae; the leaves form deep pitchers in which water collects and insects are drowned and digested.

pitcher plant

any of various insectivorous plants of the genera Sarracenia, Darlingtonia, Nepenthes, and Cephalotus, having leaves modified to form pitcher-like organs that attract and trap insects, which are then digested
References in periodicals archive ?
In a consequence, the "pitcher plants" in this desolate land have been forced to change their eating habits: the pitcher starts as a small bud and gradually expands to form a tube-shaped trap; the latter contains a syrupy fluid that the plant produces to drown its prey (e.g., insects).
The Nepenthes merrillii, or pitcher plant, is found in the primary forest between 100 meters and higher elevations.
There were also 45 flesh flies, Fletcherimyia spp, in the harvested leaves; flesh flies are not prey but instead use the pitcher plant leaves as an aquatic habitat for their larvae (Miller and Kneitel, 2005).
Caption: A tree shrew takes a bathroom break on a pitcher plant.
I am partial to hardy North American pitcher plants, if only because they are some of the prettiest perennials in the garden.
The walls of the pitcher plant are too slippery for the insect to escape.
According to Rheins, the pitcher plant will be the chassis for a family of skin care offerings.
Biologists have observed that pitcher plants "have pretty lousy traps," says Ulrike Bauer of the University of Bristol in England.
Once placed on a surface, they turned out to be every bit as slippery as the pitcher plant's lining.
He is accused of importing two endangered species - two canebrake pitcher plants and one green pitcher plant - without the correct permits.
These pitcher plants are among the hardiest, especially Sarracenia purpurea, the purple pitcher plant.
The team will work to develop manufacturing and integration strategies for its core pathogen-binding opsonin and Spleen-on-a-Chip fluidic separation technologies, as well as a novel coating technology called "SLIPS," which is a super-hydrophobic coating inspired from the slippery surface of a pitcher plant that repels nearly any material it contacts.