pitting potential

pitting potential

[′pid·iŋ pə‚ten·chəl]
(metallurgy)
The electrochemical potential in a given environment above which, but not below, a corrosion pit initiates in a metal surface.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Pitting potential was measured to address concerns about snow melting agents containing chlorine causing pitting corrosion on the outer surface of exhaust system parts.
Table 4 shows the results of measuring pitting potential under saltwater exposure.
The results confirmed that for a pitting potential Vc 10, SUS436L subjected to nitric acid electropolishing rated approximately 1.
Because of the protective oxide films the titanium implant surface exhibits anodic pitting potential that are very high ([much greater than] 1V) compared to other biomaterials used (iron, steel, cobalt-chromium alloys etc).
Anodic pitting potential requires slow scan rates (d[]0.
Appreciable amount of pitting was observed for matrix and composites beyond pitting potential due to the breakdown of passive oxide layer.
4) No significant change in pitting potential is observed in composites even though the addition of Ti[O.
From the perspective of the Catholic church and others who oppose abortion, though, the research presents a serious moral problem: One major source of stem cells -- fortunately not the only source -- is human embryos, pitting potential cures for terrible afflictions against respect for human life.
A discussion of the challenge of reliability in nuclear reactors; stainless steels; the concept of critical pitting temperature; and information on critical pitting potential (CPP)
The cyclic polarization study was carried out by increasing the potential in noble direction at a preselected scan rate of 1mV/sec until the pitting potential was observed.
The cyclic polarization study was carried out by increasing the potential in noble direction at a scan rate of 1 mV/sec until the pitting potential ([E.