Pittosporum

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Pittosporum

 

a genus of plants of the family Pittospora-ceae. The plants are small trees or shrubs (often climbing shrubs) with shiny and leathery simple leaves. The fragrant, pentamerous flowers are solitary or gathered into umbellate corymbs or panicles. The fruit is a capsule whose sticky contents enclose the seeds. There are as many as 200 species, distributed in the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. Species are also encountered on the island of Madeira and the islands of the Pacific Ocean. Some species of Pittosporum are grown as ornamentals in gardens, parks, greenhouses, and apartments. P. tobira, an evergreen shrub with very aromatic, waxy flowers, is cultivated in the countries of the Mediterranean region. In the USSR the species is found along the southern coast of the Crimea and in the Caucasus. A number of species, including P. heterophyllum and P. eugenioides, are grown along the Black Sea shore of the Caucasus.

REFERENCE

Derev’ia i kustarniki SSSR, vol. 3. Moscow-Leningrad, 1954.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are more than 20 species and cultivars of Pittosporum (both pit- TOS-porum and pitto-SPOR-um are acceptable pronunciations) that would grow in Valley gardens.
The most exciting species of the genus is Pittosporum tenuifolium, dubbed kohuhu by the Maori people in its native New Zealand.
In the meantime, it is possible to enjoy Pittosporum crassifolium 'Compacta,' or karo, a mounding shrub with soft gray-green foliage.
Pittosporum eugenioides, the lemonwood, has pale green, wavy-margined leaves that exude a lemon scent when crushed.
And lest we forget, there is no better background plant for a garden of partial shade than the creme-de-menthe-colored Pittosporum Tobira 'Variegata.
Pittosporums require more water than xeriphytic plants but still may be considered reasonably tolerant of dryness.
Yet the Pittosporum, like all plants, has its moments of glory and, by virtue of its diverse species, is a genus that demands wider recognition and use.
Wheeler's dwarf is a cultivar of a more old-fashioned plant, the regular Pittosporum Tobira, or mock orange - so-called because its flowers (which are beginning to bloom now) have a resemblance, both in appearance and in scent, to orange blossoms.
Pittosporum eugenioides has wavy golden leaves and black stems.
Pittosporum phillyraeoides, the willow pittosporum, is a small weeping tree that is invariably planted next to a pond or other water feature.
Recently, in many parts of Los Angeles, Pittosporum crassifolium "Compactum," the dwarf karo, has begun to take the place of Wheeler's dwarf where low hedges are needed.