place

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place

1. a geographical point, such as a town, city, etc.
2. 
a. an open square lined with houses of a similar type in a city or town
b. (capital when part of a street name): Grosvenor Place
3. Maths the relative position of a digit in a number
4. Horse racing
a. Brit the first, second, or third position at the finish
b. US and Canadian the first or usually the second position at the finish
c. (as modifier): a place bet
5. Theatre one of the three unities
6. another place Brit Parliamentary procedure
a. (in the House of Commons) the House of Lords
b. (in the House of Lords) the House of Commons
7. the other place Facetious
a. (at Oxford University) Cambridge University
b. (at Cambridge University) Oxford University

place

[plās]
(mathematics)
A position corresponding to a given power of the base in positional notation. Also known as column.

PLACE

Programming Language for Automatic Checkout Equipment.

["The Compiler for the Programming Language for Automatic Checkout Equipment (PLACE)", AFAPL TR-68-27, Battelle Inst, Columbus, May 1968].

Place

A function in PageMaker and other applications that allows a selection of different types of text and graphics files to be inserted within the current document. Place is similar to the Import function in other programs, but may provide additional capabilities. For example, it may be able to maintain a link to a "placed" file rather than embedding it within the document. See import.
References in classic literature ?
Once I was wicked enough to stop in a thrilling place, and say meekly, "I'm afraid it tires you, ma'am.
It is a place for a man child, although it was never a place for me," she went on.
It is stripped off--the paper--in great patches all around the head of my bed, about as far as I can reach, and in a great place on the other side of the room low down.
It was a call for a hundred laborers, and though he thought it was a "fake," he went because the place was near by.
So, he got into his place, still making complaints, and the keeper got into the place next him, and the convicts hauled themselves up as well as they could, and the convict I had recognized sat behind me with his breath on the hair of my head.
The Passage of Arms, as it was called, which was to take place at Ashby, in the county of Leicester, as champions of the first renown were to take the field in the presence of Prince John himself, who was expected to grace the lists, had attracted universal attention, and an immense confluence of persons of all ranks hastened upon the appointed morning to the place of combat.
A lingering hope, which had been indulged by some of the party, of proceeding by water, was now finally given up: the long and terrific strait of the river set all further progress at defiance, and in their disgust at the place, and their vexation at the disasters sustained there, they gave it the indignant, though not very decorous, appellation of the Devil's Scuttle Hole.
We find that this particular place had another name besides Diana's Grove.
We rode there--about a mile and a half in the sweltering sun--and visited a little Greek church which they said was built upon the ancient site; and we paid a small fee, and the holy attendant gave each of us a little wax candle as a remembrancer of the place, and I put mine in my hat and the sun melted it and the grease all ran down the back of my neck; and so now I have not any thing left but the wick, and it is a sorry and a wilted- looking wick at that.
In the centre of the eastern side of the Place, rose a heavy and hybrid construction, formed of three buildings placed in juxtaposition.
Meantime, according to the dispositions which said that "the First Column will march" and so on, the infantry of the belated columns, commanded by Bennigsen and directed by Toll, had started in due order and, as always happens, had got somewhere, but not to their appointed places.
If I were to point out all the notable places as we pass up the Broad Walk, it would be time to turn back before we reach them, and I simply wave my stick at Cecco's Tree, that memorable spot where a boy called Cecco lost his penny, and, looking for it, found twopence.