plagiarism

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Related to plagiaristic: plagiarisation, plagiarized

plagiarism

Using ideas, plots, text and other intellectual property developed by someone else while claiming it is your original work.

Viva Texas!
Since the content in this encyclopedia was placed online in 1997, and although copyright notices are prominently displayed, thousands of definitions have been, and still are, copied to other websites without copyright attribution, typically in quantities from a half dozen to a couple hundred. The most interesting copyright infringement was a Texas stage agency. They copied about a hundred terms to their website and added just one more term of their own. The term they added was "plagiarism." True story! See copyright.

Plagiarism

 

a form of violation of the rights of an author or inventor. It consists of the illegal use under one’s own name of another’s scientific, literary, or musical work, invention, or rationalization proposal, in full or in part, without recognition of the source from which the material was drawn. Under Soviet law, a plagiarist can be charged under either civil or criminal law, depending on the degree of the crime’s social danger.

Under civil law (as set forth in the Civil Code of the RSFSR, arts. 499 and 500), the author—and after his death, his heirs and other persons indicated by law—has the right to demand the restoration of his violated rights, for example, by announcements of the violation in the press. He also has the right to demand a ban on publication of the work or a ban on its distribution. In case of losses incurred, the author may demand restitution. Under criminal law (as set in the Criminal Code of the RSFSR, art. 141), plagiarism is punishable by deprivation of freedom for a period of up to one year or by a fine of up to 500 rubles.

References in periodicals archive ?
In Gatsby, it is Nick's capacity to combine these different kinds of speech that enables this narrator to relate so powerfully to the characters he describes, to come close enough to sympathize with their plagiaristic ambitions while keeping that distance he needs to gild them into gorgeousness.
Well, BBC Scotland is working on an idea called All Along The Watchtower (and let us hope, incidentally, that the singer Bob Dylan sues for the plagiaristic theft of his song title), which is se t in a military base, where the occupants are unaware that the Cold War is over, and which is billed as a modern Dad's Army.
Gleeful that Dole has been unable to ``rule'' from his post as Senate majority leader, what the left conveniently omits from the equation is its obstructionist tendencies and plagiaristic practices.
In Ozick's oeuvre, such cannibals run the gamut from the Nazi soldier who murders Rosa's baby daughter to the plagiaristic "poet" of "Virility" to the well-intentioned but sadly misguided pedagogue Joseph Brill of The Cannibal Galaxy.
In a tradition where musical ideas, melodies, and phrasing are more likely to be viewed as common property than as a matter of personal ownership, it is much easier to conclude that versions of other people's music-making are primarily a tribute to them and not a plagiaristic act.
554165): By far the best part of the Savoy Operas, tainted as they are by Gilbert's dated, cruel and often misogynistic texts, are Sullivan's overtures, expertly crafted even if they lean heavily on ex isting models (not least the scandalously plagiaristic one to Patience - check it out with Johann Strauss' Die Fledermaus).
On musical matters, Sir Simon admitted three major symphonists had received short shrift from him: Dvorak, because he had conducted a surfeit of his music early on; Vaughan Williams "because I was a very bad plagiaristic composer, and all my pieces sound ed like Vaughan Williams" and Tchaikovsky.