Plagiotropism

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Plagiotropism

 

the growth of plant organs at some angle in the direction of a stimulus (for example, the force of gravity or a light source). Lateral shoots and roots, rhizomes, and leaves are plagiotropic. Plagiotropic organs usually are bilaterally symmetrical in structure. The angle of inclination is not absolutely constant in magnitude and may change, depending on the conditions under which the plant is growing. (See also ORTHOTRO-PISM.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Time course of plant height and number of primary plagiotropic branches observed at different planting densities and irrigation regimes are shown, respectively, in Figure 2A and B.
As primary shoot length neared 10 to 15 cm, a gradual change in the orientation of growth from orthotropic (upright) to plagiotropic (horizontal) occurred.
At 120 days after transplantation, when the coffee plants had approximately 21 pairs of leaves and six plagiotropic branches, the glyphosate was applied in a way that it would not reach the upper third of the coffee plants; a backpack sprayer pressurized with C[O.
Temperature ([degrees]C) 25 30 V E FU Ge V E FU Ge Seed number 30 12 28 130 5 2 35 158 20-35 20-30 V E FU Ge V E FU Ge Seed number 76 8 59 57 4 5 45 146 Figure 3--Graph showing the number of new shoots per area from plagiotropic subterranean branches of Smilax fluminensis Steud.
The unique aspect of species belonging to the family araucariaceae is that the orthotropic stems with their bud traces, and the plagiotropic branches with their bud traces, remain permanently orthotropic and plagiotropic, respectively, regardless of any orientation or treatment imposed on them [17].
In large treefall gaps beech [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 8 OMITTED] saplings showed plagiotropic growth with no clear leader so total extension growth was much greater than net vertical extension growth.
In some Piperaceous plants, such as Peperomia parnassifolia species, vegetative propagation has been reported to occur naturally by stolon, defined as fresh plagiotropic stem aerial branches formed in the base of the plant.
Well grown leaves belonging to the third pair were collected from the plagiotropic branches of the medium third of adult mother plants and then taken to the tissue culture laboratories where the experiments were conducted.
At 120 days after transplantation in September 2008 when the coffee plants had approximately 21 pairs of leaves and six plagiotropic branches, glyphosate was applied in a way that it would not reach the upper third of the coffee plants using a pasteurized coastal pulverizer, which was pressurized with C[O.