planar transistor

planar transistor

[′plā·nər tran′zis·tər]
(electronics)
A transistor constructed by an etching and diffusion technique in which the junction is never exposed during processing, and the junctions reach the surface in one plane; characterized by very low leakage current and relatively high gain.
References in periodicals archive ?
In March 1959, Jean Ernie created the first silicon planar transistor, in which the meza-technology was replaced by a more promising planar technology for manufacturing transistors.
The unique process used to create the new Intel Atom relies on new 3-D transistor technology, which Intel calls the "Tri-Gate." It represents the first major shift from the standard transistors traditionally used in microprocessors; the planar transistor, which is a 2D process used to create most processors, was originally developed in 1959.
Not surprisingly, Hoerni's device came to be known as a planar transistor, and it's easy to argue that the integrated circuit of later days would not have been possible without Hoerni's planar transistors.
 Intel says it will be the first mass-produced transistor to go beyond the two-dimensional planar transistor structure.
In a normal 2D planar transistor, you have the Source and Drain which are separated by a channel (seen in blue) which when in the ON state allows current to flow and when in OFF state doesn't allow current flow.
With FD planar transistor technology on UTBOX wafers chip designers can enhance their usual design flows and techniques.
Intel says the "revolutionary" transistor is the first to go beyond two-dimensional planar transistor structure.
Due to presence of the wrapped gate over three sides of semiconductor channel in FinFET devices, the electrostatic control of the gate is improved and several problems of planar transistors are solved.
As things existed in currently available silicon architecture, there was just one plane that was common between the Gate and Source-Drain in Planar transistors. In FinFETs, the Gate wraps around the Source-Drain so there are two planes in contact with the Gate.
This will enable Panasonic's SoCs to achieve high levels of performance and functionality at lower power levels than was possible with planar transistors.
Meanwhile, in 1958, Jean Hoerni of Fairchild Semiconductor invented a technique for diffusing silicon to build planar transistors. But it was Robert Noyce, a co-founder of Fairchild that is credited with the first true integrated circuit.