plane of incidence


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plane of incidence

[′plān əv ′in·səd·əns]
(physics)
A plane containing the direction of propagation of a wave striking a surface and a line perpendicular to the surface. Also known as incidence plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
The "plane of incidence" is that containing the unit normal vector from the surface of incidence and the direction of the incident ray.
In particular, the effect of the plane of incidence on the current harmonic amplitudes of the WH formulation is examined and simple approximate expressions for the FSS transmission coefficient are derived.
If the TEM field distribution in a coaxial line is examined, the vector E can be observed to be at any angle to the plane of incidence. This means that a TEM wave in a coaxial line is not uniform (unlike the same wave in free space or between plane conductors).
For consideration of the reflection process on the Poincare sphere, represent the light with respect to Cartesian coordinates with the X and Y axes in and normal to the plane of incidence and the Z axis in the direction of propagation.
where [I.sub.in] is the source intensity, [r.sub.tot,p] and [r.sub.tot,s] are the amplitude reflection coefficients parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence, respectively, and [[theta].sub.p] and [[theta].sub.a] are the respective Polarizer and Analyzer angles with respect to the polarization axis.
Polarization of the total field (H or E) is determined by the type of the incident wave function (1) (u or [bar.u]), which corresponds to the direction of its electric vector (orthogonally or in parallel to the plane of incidence).
These quantities are related to the ratio of the Fresnel reflection coefficients for the light polarized parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence. The reflection coefficients are solutions to Maxwell's equations.
However, mode PT, which is polarized perpendicularly to the plane of incidence, cannot be excited by mode conversion.
The electric vector of the incident light is parallel to the plane of incidence for p-polarized light.
Ellipsometers divide polarized light into two components, one parallel to, the other perpendicular to, the plane of incidence. The two travel in phase until reflected off the material being analyzed, inducing a phase shift.
The direction k of the segment joining S to P and the normal to the radome n define the plane of incidence of the wave (gray in Fig.
The geometry of this half space case in the plane of incidence (defined by [phi]) with angle of incidence [theta], is shown in Figure 3.