planetary atmosphere


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planetary atmosphere

[′plan·ə‚ter·ē ′at·mə‚sfir]
(astronomy)
The outer shell of gas around some planets.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He suggested this could be caused by the presence of a 'blue haze' in the planetary atmosphere, which was veiling the surface but occasionally able to dissolve (the 'blue clearing'), making the markings reappear.
There has been a confused planetary atmosphere surrounding recent events.
The results show just what fraction of the radiation reaches a planet's surface, as a function of the intensity and energy of the source and the thickness of the planetary atmosphere."
A spokesman for the journal said: "The molecules may have delivered, from their stellar birthplace, the carbon that is an essential element for life as well as the gases that contributed to the planetary atmosphere."
More epoch-making than the first winged flight would be the first created planetary atmosphere where human beings might fly under their own power.
"The detection of a trace element such as lithium in a planetary atmosphere is a major breakthrough and motivates new follow-up observations and detailed theoretical modeling to corroborate the findings," study co-author Nikku Madhusudhan said in a (https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/multiple-metals-and-possible-signs-of-water-found-in-unique-exoplanet) statement .
computer modelling to figure out planetary atmosphere.
Arney used a computer model that simulates the chemistry and temperature of a planetary atmosphere, and how that atmosphere responds to different host stars.
An oblique collision where an extraterrestrial icy body impacts a planetary atmosphere with a glancing blow could generate thermodynamic conditions conducive to organic synthesis.
The other, which can also alter the spectrum, is the tendency of a planetary atmosphere to act as a lens, bending or distorting the starlight passing through it.