planetary orbit


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planetary orbit

[′plan·ə‚ter·ē ′ȯr·bət]
(astronomy)
The path that a planet has as it revolves about the sun.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Why there are stable planetary orbits and electronic ones, and how are they formed at all?
The QCM theory [6] dictates that not all planetary orbits about the central star are available as equilibrium orbits but, instead, QCM determined equilibrium orbits exist only at specific radii.
He cited the example Johannes Kepler who described planetary orbits around the sun in his composition "Harmonies of the World" way back in 1619.
The initial plan involved having the car orbit an area between the Mars and Earth planetary orbits. However, the third thruster firing pushed the rocket holding the Roadster far off course.
"When planetary orbits were finally deciphered in recent history, it became clear that Venus and Mercury had smaller orbits inside the Earth's orbit, which caused their retrograde loops."
He further added that their results demonstrated that the necessary conditions exist to modify planetary orbits and that these conditions were present at the time of planet formation, apparently due to the binary formation process.
Watch an animation of stable planetary orbits versus wacky stellar orbits at skypub.com/transitorbits.
The models the researchers built allowed them to adjust the tilt of the planetary orbits, the lean in the axes of rotation, and the ability of the terrestrial planet's atmosphere to let in light.
The chapters take up only a bit over 200 pages, and the bulk of the volume is devoted to appendices of technical information on such matters as virial theory, the formation of commensurate planetary orbits, perturbations of the Oort Cloud, global warming, and physical constants and useful data.
Second, a plea for the return to the BAA Handbook of the tables: 'Elements of the planetary orbits', along with the 'Sun, Moon and Planets' and 'Satellites' (physical data).
Using Le Verrier's perturbation theory to speed up time-consuming computer calculations of many possible configurations of planetary orbits, the HEK team showed that the observed variations can be best explained by an unseen planet about the mass of Saturn that orbits the host star every 57 days.

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