planetary wave


Also found in: Acronyms.

planetary wave

[′plan·ə‚ter·ē ′wāv]
(communications)
(meteorology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The influences of stratospheric ozone depletion and the increase in GHGs on the temperature and zonal winds in the polar stratosphere may affect the planetary-wave propagation; that is, more planetary waves caused by the stratospheric ozone depletion (elevated GHGs) propagate into the Antarctic (Arctic) stratosphere (figure not shown), further modifying the BDC.
Pan, "Modulating effects of planetary wave 3 on a stratospheric sudden warming event in 2005," Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, vol.
And similar occurrences of planetary wave resonance have been connected by other researchers to extreme events around the world, including heat waves in Europe in 2003, Russia in 2010, and the United States in 2011.
Harnik, "Observational evidence of a stratospheric influence on the troposphere by planetary wave reflection," Journal of Climate, vol.
Writing in the journal Scientific Reports, Schellnhuber and colleagues found that disruptions to planetary waves were a factor underlying 2016 wildfires in Alberta, which caused damage worth C$4.7 billion ($3.6 billion).
The model was extended by [16] to demonstrate the interactions among the mean flow, planetary waves, and synoptic eddies and proposed a new mechanism to explain the onset or destruction of blocking regimes.
Randall presents a graduate-level introductory overview of the global circulation of the atmosphere for students who have completed a graduate course in atmospheric dynamics and are familiar with such concepts as the equation of motion, the approximate hydrostatic and geostrophic balances, potential temperatures, vorticity, pressure coordinates, and planetary waves. He introduces advanced concepts as they are needed.
Due to the planetary waves the temperatures in the Martian atmosphere regularly oscillate around values notably below -128 degrees Celsius.
"During several recent extreme weather events, these planetary waves almost freeze in their tracks for weeks," said Vladimir Petoukhov, the study's lead author.
Scientists at the University of Victoria in British Columbia recently built a computer model to look at how these so-called planetary waves will respond to more heat.