planing hull

planing hull

[′plān·iŋ ‚həl]
(naval architecture)
A hull form with straight buttock lines, designed to develop positive hydrodynamic pressures on its bottom so that its draft decreases with increasing speed, enabling it to rise higher on the wave that it is generating.
References in periodicals archive ?
It had to have plenty of power and stability, planing hull form, the ability to attract younger sailors who are used to sailing 49ers and skiffs so needed to be exciting and responsive to sail, class-leading, grand prix deck layout and sailing systems, and able to go offshore (Cat 2) comfortably.
Once a vessel with a planing hull achieves enough speed, the water pushes against it with a high enough pressure resulting in a force known as hydrodynamic lift.
The Xtreme is a true planing hull so it rides higher in the water than traditional tubes and actually displaces about the same as three 24-inchers for similar buoyancy.
The new Cat engines include the C32, currently the largest Caterpillar planing hull marine propulsion engine, along with the C7, the smallest in the C family range to date.