planisphere

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planisphere

(plan -ă-sfeer) A two-dimensional map projection centered on the northern or southern pole of the celestial sphere that shows the principal stars of the constellations, the Milky Way, etc., and is equipped with a movable overlay to indicate the stars visible at a particular time on any day of the year for a particular zone of terrestrial latitude.

Planisphere

 

the representation of a sphere on a plane in a normal (polar) stereographic projection. The planisphere was used until the 17th century to determine the times of the rising and setting of celestial bodies. It was usually a coordinate grid etched on a metal disk about whose center an alidade that facilitated calculations rotated. The planisphere fell into disuse with the introduction of special tables and nomographs.

planisphere

[′plan·ə‚sfir]
(mapping)
A representation, on a plane, of the celestial sphere, especially one on a polar projection, with means provided for making certain measurements such as altitude and azimuth.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Many planispheres, such as the Philip's, included maps with the positions of several deep-sky objects, such as the Pleiades, the Andromeda Galaxy and the Orion Nebula, as well as major stars down to magnitude 5.
44-45), Planisphere of Turin (1523) showing Magellan's Strait (Harrisse 1969, map 148), and the Weimar I & II planispheres of 1527 and 1529.
On board the five ships were a total of 23 charts, 21 quadrants, 35 compass needles, 18 half-hour glasses, seven astrolabes and two planispheres.
This side of the astrolabe is similar to a modern planisphere, though it is arranged differently and can usually be adjusted to work at several latitudes, whereas modern planispheres are typically only designed for one particular latitude.
Kanas also shows early Moon maps, astrolabes, and volvelles, the precursors of planispheres.
Fortunately, today's would-be astronomer lives in a world where more observing aids--from $6 planispheres to $600 "roboscopes"--are available than ever before.
Dr Moore certainly got it right during his talk covering the basics like planispheres and star charts, as the BAA Sales stand had difficulty keeping up with demand for these items later in the day.
He also tackles tools such as planispheres, finder-scopes, and eyepieces.
Ptolemy's constellations are still with us; in fact, they dominate today's star maps and planispheres.
MILLER is creator of the Miller Planispheres and the principal author of Making and Enjoying Telescopes (Sterling Books, 1995).
Every year the club shops for 10 sets of Telrads, secondary mirrors, focusers, eyepieces, planispheres, red flashlights, and star charts.