planktonic


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planktonic

[plaŋk′tän·ik]
(ecology)
Free-floating.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The productivity in terms of planktonic biomass is also regulated by various physico-chemical factors such as, pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, transparency, total hardness, nitrates and phosphates (Mahboob and Sheri, 2001).
For the evaluation of antibacterial activity against planktonic bacteria, 100 [micro]L of each well from the direct contact inhibition assay (n=3) were vortexed in 900 [micro]L of saline solution (0.9%), diluted until [10.sup.-6] dilution, and platted in brain-heart infusion agar Petri dishes as previously described.
Bacteria have a life cycle that allows them to exist in both planktonic and biofilm phases.
They may be either whole life cycle in the water column (holoplankton) or be temporarily in this site (meroplankton), when the larvae is planktonic but the adult individual is nektonic or benthic [2, 3].
Figure 1 shows the effect of the biocides on the biomass growth of planktonic SRB on the day seven.
They evaluated the combination of LFU and gentamicin against planktonic cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.
The purpose of the present study was to analyse the planktonic growth of Streptococcus mutans on the surfaces of 3 implants retrieved after 3 different peri-implantitis treatments.
Using ametagenomic approach here we describe the microbial diversity of the MFC planktonic and anodic communities derived from the different inocula.
Like all jellyfish, it's a carnivore, feeding on planktonic animals that drift into its curtain of tentacles, which can stretch for several meters.