plant virus


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plant virus

[′plant ‚vī·rəs]
(virology)
A virus that replicates only within plant cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Plant virus emergence and evolution: Origins, new encounter scenarios, factors driving emergence, effects of changing world conditions, and prospects for control.
Sztuba-Solinska J, Urbanowicz A, Figlerowicz M, Bujarski JJ (2011) RNA-RNA recombination in plant virus replication and evolution.
In [15], a delay differential equations was proposed to model the interaction between plants, a plant virus, and the insect-vector that transfers the virus from one plant to another.
The first record in the literature of the possible plant virus disease that appeared in Manyoshu, a Japanese classic anthology, as far back as the time of the 8th century.
Pietersen, "Plant virus disease problems in the developing world," Advances in Virus Research, vol.
Cellular factors in plant virus movement: at the leading edge of macromolecular trafficking in plant.
Humans have antibodies against a plant virus: evidence from tobacco mosaic virus.
This study aims to demonstrate a proof of concept of combining UCNPs as biolabeling with immunomagnetic separation for the detection of plant virus. Hence, no effort has been made for extensive parametric optimization.
The stem cells are nestled into a nanotopography defined by the plant virus, and within that nanotopography the cells make contact with the variety of chemical groups on the viral surface.
The topics include induced systematic resistance and plant responses to fungal biocontrol agents, cellular remodeling during plant virus infection, the current epidemiological understanding of citrus huanglongbing, companion planting to manage parasitic plants, phytoviruses and the digital revolution, quantitative disease resistance and quantitative resistance loci in breeding, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis as a pathogen model, the ecology of plant and free-living nematodes in natural and agricultural soil, and studying plant-pathogen interactions in the genomics era.
And some varieties of squash and papaya have been engineered with plant virus genes that make them resistant to those particular plant viruses.
The Dow Chemical Company (Midland, MI) has patented a method for inserting Mucin peptide epitopes into the coat protein of a plant virus (e.g., a comovirus such as CPMV) having a beta-barrel structure at an immunogenically effective site, such as in a loop connecting beta sheets or at/near the C-terminus.