plasma etching


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plasma etching

[′plaz·mə ′ech·iŋ]
(electronics)
A method of forming integrated-circuit patterns on a surface, in which charged species in a plasma formed above a masked surface are directed to impact the nonmasked regions of the surface and knock out substrate atoms. Also known as dry plasma etching.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Low-temperature curing is unconventional in electron-beam lithography and PMMA typically shows low resistance to oxygen plasma etching [33].
In order to reduce this high reflectivity and to trap the light in the solar cell, different surface texturing techniques have been developed over the last years [4-8] like plasma etching [9, 10], mechanical engraving [10], chemical anisotropic etching [11], laser texturing [12, 13], and reactive ion etching [14, 15].
This may due to the effect that the deposition processes are more dominant than the plasma etching processes.
At relatively low power (e.g., 50 W), the plasma etching was weak and slow.
Later, with the silica nanospheres as etch masks, electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching with [CF.sub.4] and [O.sub.2] gas ([CF.sub.4] : [O.sub.2] = 10: 1) is used to etch down the Si[N.sub.x] and produce the nanocone arrays.
Among his topics are fundamentals of vacuum and plasma technology, physical and chemical vapor deposition, substrate materials, wet chemical and plasma etching, and metrology for device fabrication.
[34] Goodyear AL, Mackenzie S, Olynick DL, Anderson EH (2000) High resolution inductively coupled plasma etching of 30 nm lines and spaces in tungsten and silicon.
The demand for global bromine market is anticipated to show considerable growth during the forecast period 2015-2020 due to its increased demand in several applications such as biocides, flame retardants, oil & gas drilling, plasma etching, and PTA synthesis.
Sequential Infiltration Synthesis (SIS) Lithography, developed by Argonne National Laboratory and implemented in industrial settings by several industry leaders, gives the resist the ability to withstand plasma etching. It uses a sequence of gaseous chemical exposures to infiltrate and infuse the polymer with tough ceramic materials.
The photoresist and TiW/Cu seed layers are successively stripped by acetone and by plasma etching respectively.